Voice Video Endpoint Security Requirements Guide

U_Voice_Video_Endpoint_SRG_V1R9_Manual-xccdf.xml

This Security Requirements Guide is published as a tool to improve the security of Department of Defense (DoD) information systems. The requirements are derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 and related documents. Comments or proposed revisions to this document should be sent via e-mail to the following address: [email protected]
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Version / Release: V1R9

Published: 2019-03-15

Updated At: 2019-05-04 00:38:45

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Vuln Rule Version CCI Severity Title Description
SV-81173r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00001 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must integrate into the implemented 802.1x network access control system. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x.
SV-81175r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00002 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x.
SV-81177r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00003 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint PC port must connect to an 802.1x supplicant, or the PC port must be disabled. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x. A Voice Video Endpoint with a PC port may break 802.1x LAN access control mechanisms when the network access switchport is authorized during the Voice Video Endpoint authentication to the network. This condition may permit devices connected to the PC port to access the LAN. The access switchport can be configured in one of the following modes: single-host, multi-host, or multi-domain. Single-host allows only one device to authenticate, and only packets from this devices MAC address will be allowed, dropping all other packets. Multi-host mode requires one host to authenticate but once this is done, all packets regardless of source MAC address will be allowed. For both the PC attached to the PC port and the Voice Video Endpoint to authenticate separately, multi-domain authentication on the access switchport must be configured. This divides the switchport into a data and a voice domain. In this case if more than one device attempts authorization on either the voice or the data domain of a port, the switchport goes into an error disable state. Disabling the PC port requires the network access switchports are configured with the appropriate VLAN for the VVoIP or VTC traffic and placing the disabled PC port traffic on the unused VLAN. MAC Address Bypass (MAB) is a possible mitigation for this vulnerability.
SV-81179r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00004 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The unused hardware Voice Video Endpoint PC port must be disabled. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x. A Voice Video Endpoint with a PC port may break 802.1x LAN access control mechanisms when the network access switchport is authorized during the Voice Video Endpoint authentication to the network. This condition may permit devices connected to the PC port to access the LAN. Daisy chaining devices on a single LAN drop protected by 802.1x must be prohibited unless the PC port is an 802.1x authenticator and configured to work with an approved authentication server. Disabling the PC port requires the network access switchports are configured with the appropriate VLAN for the VVoIP or VTC traffic and placing the disabled PC port traffic on the unused VLAN. MAC Address Bypass (MAB) is a possible mitigation for this vulnerability.
SV-81181r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00005 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint with a PC port must have the switchport configured as single-host or enable 802.1x multi-domain authentication. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x. A Voice Video Endpoint with a PC port may break 802.1x LAN access control mechanisms when the network access switchport is authorized during the Voice Video Endpoint authentication to the network. This condition may permit devices connected to the PC port to access the LAN. Daisy chaining devices on a single LAN drop protected by 802.1x must be prohibited unless the PC port is an 802.1x authenticator and configured to work with an approved authentication server. Disabling the PC port requires the network access switchports are configured with the appropriate VLAN for the VVoIP or VTC traffic and placing the disabled PC port traffic on the unused VLAN. MAC Address Bypass (MAB) is a possible mitigation for this vulnerability.
SV-81183r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00006 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint not supporting 802.1x must be configured to use MAC Authentication Bypass (MAB) on the access switchport. IEEE 802.1x is a protocol used to control access to LAN services via a network access switchport or wireless access point that requires a device or user to authenticate to the network element and become authorized by the authentication server before accessing the network. This standard is used to activate the network access switchport limiting traffic to a specific VLAN or install traffic filters. Implementing 802.1x port security on each access switchport denies all other MAC users, which eliminates the security risk of additional users attaching to a switch to bypass authentication. The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must be an 802.1x supplicant and integrate into the 802.1x access control system. When 802.1x is used, all devices connecting to the LAN are required to use 802.1x. A Voice Video Endpoint with a PC port may break 802.1x LAN access control mechanisms when the network access switchport is authorized during the Voice Video Endpoint authentication to the network. This condition may permit devices connected to the PC port to access the LAN. Daisy chaining devices on a single LAN drop protected by 802.1x must be prohibited unless the PC port is an 802.1x authenticator and configured to work with an approved authentication server. Disabling the PC port requires the network access switchports are configured with the appropriate VLAN for the VVoIP or VTC traffic and placing the disabled PC port traffic on the unused VLAN. MAC Address Bypass (MAB) is a possible mitigation for this vulnerability.
SV-81189r1_rule SRG-NET-000053-VVEP-00009 CCI-000054 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must limit the number of concurrent sessions to two (2) users. Voice video endpoint management includes the ability to control the number of user sessions and limiting the number of allowed user sessions helps limit risk related to DoS attacks. Voice video endpoint sessions occur peer-to-peer for media streams and client-server with session managers. For those endpoints that conference together multiple streams, the limit may be increased according to policy but a limit must still exist.
SV-81191r3_rule SRG-NET-000520-VVEP-00010 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must apply 802.1Q VLAN tags to signaling and media traffic. When Voice Video Endpoints do not dynamically assign 802.1Q VLAN tags as data is created and combined, it is possible the VLAN tags will not correctly reflect the data type with which they are associated. VLAN tags are used as security attributes. These attributes are typically associated with signaling and media streams within the application and are used to enable the implementation of access control and flow control policies. Security labels for packets may include traffic flow information (e.g., source, destination, protocol combination), traffic classification based on QoS markings for preferred treatment, and VLAN identification. Virtualized networking is used to separate voice video traffic from other types of traffic, such as data, management, and other special types. VLANs provide segmentation at layer 2. Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) provides segmentation at layer 3, and works with Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) for enterprise and WAN environments. When VRF is used without MPLS, it is referred to as VRF lite. For Voice Video systems, subnets, VLANs, and VRFs are used to separate media and signaling streams from all other traffic.
SV-81193r3_rule SRG-NET-000520-VVEP-00011 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must use a voice video VLAN, separate from all other VLANs. Virtualized networking is used to separate voice video traffic from other types of traffic, such as data, management, and other special types. VLANs provide segmentation at layer 2. Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) provides segmentation at layer 3, and works with Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) for enterprise and WAN environments. When VRF is used without MPLS, it is referred to as VRF lite. For Voice Video systems, subnets, VLANs, and VRFs are used to separate media and signaling streams from all other traffic.
SV-81195r3_rule SRG-NET-000057-VVEP-00012 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint PC port must maintain VLAN separation from the voice video VLAN, or be disabled. Virtualized networking is used to separate voice video traffic from other types of traffic, such as data, management, and other special types. VLANs provide segmentation at layer 2. Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) provides segmentation at layer 3, and works with Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) for enterprise and WAN environments. When VRF is used without MPLS, it is referred to as VRF lite. For Voice Video systems, subnets, VLANs, and VRFs are used to separate media and signaling streams from all other traffic.
SV-81197r1_rule SRG-NET-000366-VVEP-00014 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must block both inbound and outbound communications traffic between Unified Capability (UC) and Videoconferencing (VC) clients independently configured by end users and external service providers for voice and video. Various communication services such as public VoIP and Instant Messaging services route traffic over their own networks and are stored on their own servers; therefore, that traffic can be accessed at any time by the provider and potentially intercepted. Communication clients independently configured by end users and external service providers include, for example, instant messaging clients. Traffic blocking does not apply to communication clients that are configured by organizations to perform authorized functions.
SV-81199r1_rule SRG-NET-000147-VVEP-00015 CCI-001942 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must implement replay-resistant authentication mechanisms for network access. A replay attack may enable an unauthorized user to gain access to the application. Authentication sessions between the authenticator and the application validating the user credentials must not be vulnerable to a replay attack. An authentication process resists replay attacks if it is impractical to achieve a successful authentication by recording and replaying a previous authentication message. Voice video endpoints often use passwords or PINs that can be easily exploited. This requirement only applies to components where this is specific to the function of the device or has the concept of an organizational user. This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (i.e., device management).
SV-81201r1_rule SRG-NET-000147-VVEP-00016 CCI-001942 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint using SIP or AS-SIP signaling must prevent cross-site scripting attacks caused by improper filtering or validation of the content of SIP invitation fields. A cross-site scripting vulnerability has been demonstrated by adding scripting code to the "From:" field in the SIP invite. Upon receiving the invite, the embedded code can be executed by a vulnerable embedded web server to download additional malicious code and launch an attack. The demonstration of the vulnerability also exists on www.securityfocus.com under Bugtraq ID: 25987, which pops up a specific alert box on the user’s workstation after downloading a SIP invite. While this vulnerability has been demonstrated on a specific IP phone, it could potentially affect all SIP-based endpoints or clients and their signaling partners. This vulnerability is a result of improper filtering or validation of the content of the various fields in the SIP invite and potentially the Session Description Protocol (SDP) portion of the invite. The injected code potentially causes malicious code to be run on the target device, to include an endpoint (hard or soft), a session controller, or any other SIP signaling partner. Additionally, this vulnerability may affect applications other than SIP VoIP clients, such as IM clients. A similar vulnerability results when URLs embedded in SIP messages are launched automatically.
SV-81203r3_rule SRG-NET-000371-VVEP-00017 CCI-002418 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must protect the integrity of transmitted configuration files from the Voice Video Session Manager. Without protection of the transmitted information, confidentiality and integrity may be compromised as unprotected communications can be intercepted and either read or altered. When Voice Video Endpoint configuration files traverse a network without encryption for confidentiality, system information can be intercepted by an adversary. Encryption of the configuration files mitigates this vulnerability. However, TFTP is the most common protocol used for configuration file transfers and does not natively encrypt data. The Cisco TFTP implementation for VoIP systems uses encryption to both store and transfer configuration files. Refer to the “CISCO-UCM-TFTP” Vulnerability Analysis report provided by the Protocols, Ports, and Services management site for more details. Integrity checks during the transmission of configuration files ensure no changes have been introduced by adversarial attacks. TLS can be utilized to secure SIP and SCCP signaling by configuring the session manager in a secure mode. DoD-to-DoD voice communications are generally considered to contain sensitive information and therefore DoD voice and data traffic crossing the unclassified DISN must be encrypted. Cryptographic mechanisms such as Media Access Control Security (MACsec) implemented to protect information integrity include cryptographic hash functions that have common application in digital signatures, checksums, and message authentication codes.
SV-81205r3_rule SRG-NET-000371-VVEP-00018 CCI-002418 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must protect the confidentiality of transmitted configuration files from the Voice Video Session Manager. Without protection of the transmitted information, confidentiality and integrity may be compromised as unprotected communications can be intercepted and either read or altered. When Voice Video Endpoint configuration files traverse a network without encryption for confidentiality, system information can be intercepted by an adversary. Encryption of the configuration files mitigates this vulnerability. However, TFTP is the most common protocol used for configuration file transfers and does not natively encrypt data. The Cisco TFTP implementation for VoIP systems uses encryption to both store and transfer configuration files. Refer to the “CISCO-UCM-TFTP” Vulnerability Analysis report provided by the Protocols, Ports, and Services management site for more details. Integrity checks during the transmission of configuration files ensure no changes have been introduced by adversarial attacks. TLS can be utilized to secure SIP and SCCP signaling by configuring the session manager in a secure mode. DoD-to-DoD voice communications are generally considered to contain sensitive information and therefore DoD voice and data traffic crossing the unclassified DISN must be encrypted. Cryptographic mechanisms such as Media Access Control Security (MACsec) implemented to protect information integrity include cryptographic hash functions that have common application in digital signatures, checksums, and message authentication codes.
SV-81207r2_rule SRG-NET-000015-VVEP-00019 CCI-000213 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must dynamically implement configuration file changes. Configuration management includes the management of security features and assurances through control of changes made to device hardware, software, and firmware throughout the life cycle of a product. Secure configuration management relies on performance and functional attributes of products to determine the appropriate security features and assurances used to measure a system configuration state. When configuration changes are made, it is critical for those changes to be implemented by the Voice Video Endpoint as quickly as possible. This ensures that Voice Video Endpoints communicate using the correct address books, session managers, gateways, and border elements.
SV-81209r2_rule SRG-NET-000041-VVEP-00020 CCI-000048 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must display the Standard Mandatory DoD Notice and Consent Banner before granting access to the network. Display of a standardized and approved use notification before granting access to the network ensures privacy and security notification verbiage used is consistent with applicable federal laws, Executive Orders, directives, policies, regulations, standards, and guidance. System use notifications are required only for access via logon interfaces with human users and are not required when such human interfaces do not exist. This requirement applies to Voice Video Endpoints that have the concept of a user account and have the logon function residing on the network element. The banner must be formatted in accordance with current policy. Use the following verbiage for network elements that can accommodate banners of 1300 characters: "You are accessing a U.S. Government (USG) Information System (IS) that is provided for USG-authorized use only. By using this IS (which includes any device attached to this IS), you consent to the following conditions: -The USG routinely intercepts and monitors communications on this IS for purposes including, but not limited to, penetration testing, COMSEC monitoring, network operations and defense, personnel misconduct (PM), law enforcement (LE), and counterintelligence (CI) investigations. -At any time, the USG may inspect and seize data stored on this IS. -Communications using, or data stored on, this IS are not private, are subject to routine monitoring, interception, and search, and may be disclosed or used for any USG-authorized purpose. -This IS includes security measures (e.g., authentication and access controls) to protect USG interests--not for your personal benefit or privacy. -Notwithstanding the above, using this IS does not constitute consent to PM, LE or CI investigative searching or monitoring of the content of privileged communications, or work product, related to personal representation or services by attorneys, psychotherapists, or clergy, and their assistants. Such communications and work product are private and confidential. See User Agreement for details." Use the following verbiage for operating systems that have severe limitations on the number of characters that can be displayed in the banner: "I've read & consent to terms in IS user agreem't."
SV-81215r2_rule SRG-NET-000042-VVEP-00021 CCI-000050 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must retain the Standard Mandatory DoD Notice and Consent Banner on the screen until users acknowledge the usage conditions and take explicit actions to log on for further access. The banner must be acknowledged by the user prior to allowing the user access to the network. This provides assurance that the user has seen the message and accepted the conditions for access. If the consent banner is not acknowledged by the user, DoD will not be in compliance with system use notifications required by law. To establish acceptance of the application usage policy, a click-through banner at application logon is required. The network element must prevent further activity until the user executes a positive action to manifest agreement by clicking on a box indicating "OK". System use notifications are required only for access via logon interfaces with human users and are not required when such human interfaces do not exist. This requirement applies to Voice Video Endpoints that have the concept of a user account and have the logon function residing on the network element.
SV-81217r1_rule SRG-NET-000074-VVEP-00022 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must produce session (call detail) records containing what type of connection occurred. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, type of connection, connection origination, time stamps, outcome, user identities, and user identifiers. Additionally, an adversary must not be able to modify or delete session records. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81219r1_rule SRG-NET-000075-VVEP-00023 CCI-000131 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must produce session (call detail) records containing when (date and time) the connection occurred. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, type of connection, connection origination, time stamps, outcome, user identities, and user identifiers. Additionally, an adversary must not be able to modify or delete session records. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81221r1_rule SRG-NET-000076-VVEP-00024 CCI-000132 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must produce session (call detail) records containing where the connection occurred. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, type of connection, connection origination, time stamps, outcome, user identities, and user identifiers. Additionally, an adversary must not be able to modify or delete session records. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81223r1_rule SRG-NET-000078-VVEP-00025 CCI-000134 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must produce session (call detail) records containing the outcome of the connection. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, type of connection, connection origination, time stamps, outcome, user identities, and user identifiers. Additionally, an adversary must not be able to modify or delete session records. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81225r1_rule SRG-NET-000079-VVEP-00026 CCI-001487 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must produce session (call detail) records containing the identity of all users. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, type of connection, connection origination, time stamps, outcome, user identities, and user identifiers. Additionally, an adversary must not be able to modify or delete session records. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81227r1_rule SRG-NET-000113-VVEP-00027 CCI-000169 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must provide session (call detail) record generation capability. Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session records for Voice Video systems are generally handled in a similar fashion to audit records for other systems and are used for billing, usage analysis, and record support for actions taken. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-81229r2_rule SRG-NET-000213-VVEP-00028 CCI-001133 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must terminate all network connections associated with a communications session at the end of the session. Terminating an idle session within a short time period reduces the window of opportunity for unauthorized personnel to take control of a management session enabled on the console or console port that has been left unattended. In addition, quickly terminating an idle session will also free up resources committed by the managed network element. Terminating network connections associated with communications sessions includes, de-allocating associated TCP/IP address/port pairs at the device or operating system level, and de-allocating networking assignments at the application level if multiple application sessions are using a single, operating system level network connection.
SV-81231r2_rule SRG-NET-000138-VVEP-00029 CCI-000764 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must uniquely identify participating users. To assure accountability and prevent unauthenticated access, users must be identified to prevent potential misuse and compromise of the system. The Voice Video Endpoint must display the source of an incoming call and the participant's identity to aid the user in deciding whether to answer a call. The information potentially at risk is that which can be seen in the physical area of the Voice Video Endpoint or carried by the conference in which it is participating. This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (i.e., device management).
SV-81233r1_rule SRG-NET-000341-VVEP-00030 CCI-001953 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must accept a Common Access Card (CAC) or derived credentials. The use of CAC or derived credentials facilitates standardization and reduces the risk of unauthorized access. DoD has mandated the use of the CAC to support identity management and personal authentication for systems covered under HSPD 12, as well as a primary component of layered protection for national security systems.
SV-81235r1_rule SRG-NET-000342-VVEP-00031 CCI-001954 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must electronically verify the Common Access Card (CAC) or derived credentials. The use of CAC or derived credentials facilitates standardization and reduces the risk of unauthorized access. DoD has mandated the use of the CAC to support identity management and personal authentication for systems covered under HSPD 12, as well as a primary component of layered protection for national security systems.
SV-81237r1_rule SRG-NET-000140-VVEP-00032 CCI-000766 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must use multifactor authentication for network access. To assure accountability and prevent unauthenticated access, users must utilize multifactor authentication to prevent potential misuse and compromise of the system. Multifactor authentication uses two or more factors to achieve authentication. Factors include: (i) Something you know (e.g., password/PIN); (ii) Something you have (e.g., cryptographic identification device, token); or (iii) Something you are (e.g., biometric). Network access is any access to an application by a user (or process acting on behalf of a user) where said access is obtained through a network connection. The DoD CAC with DoD-approved PKI is an example of multifactor authentication. This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (i.e., device management).
SV-81239r2_rule SRG-NET-000400-VVEP-00033 CCI-000197 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint, when using passwords or PINs for authentication or authorization, must cryptographically-protect the transmission. Passwords need to be protected at all times and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised. This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (management).
SV-81241r2_rule SRG-NET-000165-VVEP-00034 CCI-000186 HIGH When using PKI-based authentication, the Voice Video Endpoint must enforce authorized access to the corresponding private key. If the private key is discovered, an attacker can use the key to authenticate as an authorized user and gain access to the network infrastructure. The cornerstone of the PKI is the private key used to encrypt or digitally sign information. If the private key is stolen, this will lead to the compromise of the authentication and non-repudiation gained through PKI because the attacker can use the private key to authenticate to network devices. This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (management).
SV-81243r2_rule SRG-NET-000164-VVEP-00035 CCI-000185 HIGH When using PKI-based authentication, the Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must validate certificates by constructing a certification path (which includes status information) to an accepted trust anchor. Without path validation, an informed trust decision by the relying party cannot be made when presented with any certificate not already explicitly trusted. A trust anchor is an authoritative entity represented via a public key. Within a chain of trust, the top entity to be trusted is the "root certificate" or "trust anchors" such as a Certification Authority (CA). A certification path starts with the subject certificate and proceeds through a number of intermediate certificates up to a trusted root certificate, typically issued by a trusted CA. This requirement verifies that a certification path to an accepted trust anchor is used for certificate validation and that the path includes status information. Path validation is necessary for a relying party to make an informed trust decision when presented with any certificate not already explicitly trusted. Status information for certification paths includes certificate revocation lists or online certificate status protocol responses. Validation of the certificate status information is out of scope for this requirement.
SV-81245r1_rule SRG-NET-000345-VVEP-00036 CCI-001991 MEDIUM When using PKI-based authentication, the Voice Video Endpoint used for videoconferencing must implement a local cache of revocation data to support path discovery and validation in the event the network path becomes unavailable. Without configuring a local cache of revocation data, there is the potential to allow access to users who are no longer authorized (users with revoked certificates). This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (i.e., device management).
SV-81247r3_rule SRG-NET-000371-VVEP-00037 CCI-002418 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must use encryption for signaling and media traffic. Without protection of the transmitted information, confidentiality and integrity may be compromised as unprotected communications can be intercepted and either read or altered. TLS can be utilized to secure SIP and SCCP signaling by configuring the session manager in a secure mode. DoD-to-DoD voice communications are generally considered to contain sensitive information and therefore DoD voice and data traffic crossing the unclassified DISN must be encrypted. Cryptographic mechanisms such as Media Access Control Security (MACsec) implemented to protect information include cryptographic hash functions that have common application in digital signatures, checksums, and message authentication codes.
SV-81249r2_rule SRG-NET-000352-VVEP-00038 CCI-002450 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint processing classified information over public networks must implement NSA-approved cryptography. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of utilizing encryption to protect data. The network element must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated.
SV-81251r2_rule SRG-NET-000510-VVEP-00039 CCI-002450 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint processing unclassified information must implement NIST FIPS-validated cryptography. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of utilizing encryption to protect data. The network element must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated.
SV-81253r2_rule SRG-NET-000510-VVEP-00041 CCI-002450 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint processing unclassified information must implement NIST FIPS-validated cryptography to generate cryptographic hashes. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of utilizing encryption to protect data. The network element must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated.
SV-81255r1_rule SRG-NET-000353-VVEP-00042 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must provide an explicit indication of current participants in all Videoconference (VC)-based and IP-based online meetings and conferences. Providing an explicit indication of current participants in teleconferences helps to prevent unauthorized individuals from participating in collaborative teleconference sessions without the explicit knowledge of other participants. Teleconferences allow groups of users to collaborate and exchange information. Without knowing who is in attendance, information could be compromised. This requirement excludes audio-only teleconferences using traditional telephony. Network elements that provide a teleconference capability must provide a clear indication of who is attending the meeting, thus providing all attendees with the capability to clearly identify users who are in attendance.
SV-81257r1_rule SRG-NET-000236-VVEP-00043 CCI-001665 MEDIUM In the event of a device failure, hardware Voice Video Endpoints must preserve any information necessary to determine cause of failure and return to operations with least disruption to service. Failure in a known state can address safety or security in accordance with the mission needs of the organization. Failure to a known secure state helps prevent a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability in the event of a failure of the information system or a component of the system. Preserving network element state information helps to facilitate network element restart and return to the operational mode of the organization with less disruption to mission-essential processes.
SV-81259r1_rule SRG-NET-000190-VVEP-00044 CCI-001090 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must prevent unauthorized and unintended information transfer via shared system resources. Preventing unauthorized information transfers mitigates the risk of information, including encrypted representations of information, produced by the actions of prior users/roles (or the actions of processes acting on behalf of prior users/roles) from being available to any current users/roles (or current processes) that obtain access to shared system resources (e.g., registers, main memory, hard disks) after those resources have been released back to information systems. The control of information in shared resources is also commonly referred to as object reuse and residual information protection. Unified capability (UC) and videoconferencing (VC) vendors have included capabilities in products that must be disabled for users. Many current UC and VC products include hooks into email, IM, and local file transfer. Peer networking options allowing transfer often use holding storage locations that are accessible to all users. This would allow potentially sensitive information to be shared without central control.
SV-81261r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00045 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint supporting Command and Control (C2) communications must implement Multilevel Precedence and Preemption (MLPP) dialing to enable Routine, Priority, Immediate, Flash, and Flash Override. Configuring the C2 Voice Video Endpoint to implement MLPP ensures vital high-level communications occurs regardless of environmental, geographical, and political conditions. When conditions require immediate discussion among high-level officials, the C2 communications systems must be capable of implementing MLPP. The MLPP service allows properly validated users to place priority calls and when necessary, C2 users can preempt lower priority phone calls. Precedence designates the priority level that is associated with a call and preemption designates the process of terminating lower precedence calls currently using a Voice Video Endpoint. A call of higher precedence can be extended to or through the device. A validated C2 user can preempt calls to targeted stations when AS-SIP is fully implemented on the network or through fully subscribed time division multiplexing (TDM) trunks. This capability assures high-level personnel of communication to critical organizations and personnel during network stress situations, such as a national emergency or degraded network situations.
SV-81263r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00046 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint supporting Command and Control (C2) communications must implement Multilevel Precedence and Preemption (MLPP) call disconnect to enable Routine, Priority, Immediate, Flash, and Flash Override. Configuring the C2 Voice Video Endpoint to implement MLPP ensures vital high-level communication occurs regardless of environmental, geographical, and political conditions. When conditions require immediate discussion among high-level officials, the C2 communications systems must be capable of implementing MLPP. The MLPP service allows properly validated users to place priority calls and when necessary, C2 users can preempt lower-priority phone calls. Precedence designates the priority level that is associated with a call and preemption designates the process of terminating lower-precedence calls currently using a Voice Video Endpoint. A call of higher precedence can be extended to or through the device. A validated C2 user can preempt calls to targeted stations when AS-SIP is fully implemented on the network or through fully subscribed time division multiplexing (TDM) trunks. This capability assures high-level personnel of communication to critical organizations and personnel during network stress situations, such as a national emergency or degraded network situations.
SV-81265r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00047 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint supporting Command and Control (C2) communications must implement Assured Service Session Initiation Protocol (AS-SIP). Configuring the C2 Voice Video Endpoint to implement MLPP ensures vital high-level communication occurs regardless of environmental, geographical, and political conditions. When conditions require immediate discussion among high-level officials, the C2 communications systems must be capable of implementing MLPP. The MLPP service allows properly validated users to place priority calls and when necessary, C2 users can preempt lower-priority phone calls. Precedence designates the priority level that is associated with a call and preemption designates the process of terminating lower-precedence calls currently using a Voice Video Endpoint. A call of higher precedence can be extended to or through the device. A validated C2 user can preempt calls to targeted stations when AS-SIP is fully implemented on the network or through fully subscribed time division multiplexing (TDM) trunks. This capability assures high-level personnel of communication to critical organizations and personnel during network stress situations, such as a national emergency or degraded network situations.
SV-81267r2_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00048 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint microphone must provide hardware mechanisms, such as push-to-talk (PTT) handset switches, to prevent pickup and transmission of sensitive or classified information over non-secure networks. Microphones used with videoconferencing are designed to be extremely sensitive, designed to pick up audio from anywhere within a conference room. The microphones may pick up sidebar conversations with no relationship to the conference or call in progress. Speakerphones exhibit a similar vulnerability. This is especially at risk when unclassified conversations are conducted in classified spaces. Users or operators of videoconferencing systems must take care regarding what is being said and seen during a conference call and what sensitive information can be picked up by a camera or microphone. Voice Video Endpoints used in classified areas must use hardware mechanisms such as push-to-talk (PTT) to prevent conversations occurring in the area of the call from being heard over unclassified systems. This capability mitigates the risk to compromise sensitive or classified information not related to the conversation in progress. Speakers embedded in or connected to a Voice Video Endpoint may be turned up loud enough to be heard across a room or in the next workspace, risking compromise or sensitive or classified information.
SV-81269r2_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00049 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint camera must provide hardware mechanisms, such as push-to-see (PTS) camera switches, to prevent pickup and transmission of sensitive or classified information over non-secure networks. Cameras used with Voice Video Endpoints may reveal sensitive or classified information. This is especially at risk when unclassified conversations are conducted in classified spaces. Users or operators of videoconferencing systems must take care regarding what is being said and seen during a conference call and what sensitive information can be picked up by a camera or microphone. Voice Video Endpoints used in classified areas must use hardware mechanisms such as push-to-see (PTS) to prevent sensitive or classified information picked up by the camera in the area of the call from being transmitted over unclassified systems. This capability mitigates the risk to compromise sensitive or classified information not related to the conversation in progress.
SV-81271r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00050 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint auto-answer feature must be disabled. A Voice Video Endpoint set to automatically answer a call with audio or video capabilities enabled risks transmitting information not intended for the caller. In the event a Voice Video Endpoint automatically answered a call during a classified meeting or discussion. Potentially sensitive or classified information could be transmitted. The auto-answer feature must not be activated by a user unless the feature is required to satisfy mission requirements.
SV-81273r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00051 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must disable or restrict web browser capabilities permitting the endpoint to browse the internet or intranet. Permitting hardware Voice Video Endpoints to browse the internet or enterprise intranet freely opens the endpoint to the possibility of inadvertently downloading malicious code to the endpoint for which it may have no protection. Voice Video Endpoints typically do not support host based intrusion detection or anti-virus software. While the downloaded malicious code might not affect the endpoint itself, the endpoint could be used by the malicious code as a launching pad into the network and attached workstations or servers.
SV-81275r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00052 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must disable or restrict built-in web servers. Hardware Voice Video Endpoints sometimes contain a web server for the implementation of various functions and features. In many cases these are used to configure the network settings or user preferences on the device. In some Voice Video Endpoints, a user can access a missed call list, call history, or other information. If access to such a web server is not restricted to authorized entities, the device supporting it is subject to unauthorized access and compromise.
SV-81277r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00053 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must prevent the configuration of network IP settings without the use of a PIN or password. Many Voice Video Endpoints can set or display configuration settings in the instrument itself. This presents a risk if a user obtains information such as the IP addresses and URLs of system components. This obtained information could be used to facilitate an attack on the system. Therefore these devices should be considered a target to be defended against such individuals that would collect voice network information for illicit purposes. To mitigate information gathering by the adversaries, measures must be taken to protect this information.
SV-81279r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00054 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must prevent the display of network IP settings without the use of a PIN or password. Many Voice Video Endpoints can set or display configuration settings in the instrument itself. This presents a risk if a user obtains information such as the IP addresses and URLs of system components. This obtained information could be used to facilitate an attack on the system. Therefore these devices should be considered a target to be defended against such individuals that would collect voice network information for illicit purposes. To mitigate information gathering by the adversaries, measures must be taken to protect this information.
SV-81281r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00055 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must not use the default PIN or password to access configuration and display of network IP settings. Many Voice Video Endpoints can set or display configuration settings in the instrument itself. This presents a risk if a user obtains information such as the IP addresses and URLs of system components. This obtained information could be used to facilitate an attack on the system. Therefore these devices should be considered a target to be defended against individuals that would collect voice network information for illicit purposes. To mitigate information gathering by the adversaries, measures must be taken to protect this information.
SV-81283r1_rule SRG-NET-000131-VVEP-00056 CCI-000381 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must be configured to disable or remove non-essential capabilities. It is detrimental for Voice Video Endpoints when unnecessary features are enabled by default. Often these features are enabled by default with functionality exceeding requirements or mission objectives. These unnecessary capabilities or services are often overlooked and therefore may remain unsecured. They increase the risk to the platform by providing additional attack vectors. Network elements are capable of providing a wide variety of functions and services. Some of the functions and services, provided by default, may not be necessary to support essential organizational operations (e.g., key missions, functions).
SV-81285r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00057 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must prevent the user from installing third-party software. Unauthorized third-party software is challenging the security posture of DoD. Most established vendors have developed patch management process that prevents risk, resulting in an estimated 80 percent of threats arise from third-party software. Preventing users from installing third-party software limits organizational exposure. Additionally, preventing installation of untrusted software further reduces risk to the network.
SV-81287r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00058 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must prevent installation of untrusted third-party software. Unauthorized third-party software is challenging the security posture of DoD. Most established vendors have developed a patch management process that prevents risk, resulting in an estimated 80 percent of threats arising from third-party software. Preventing users from installing third-party software limits organizational exposure. Additionally, preventing installation of untrusted software further reduces risk to the network. Vendors that prevent installation of all third-party software meet the intent of this requirement.
SV-81289r2_rule SRG-NET-000132-VVEP-00059 CCI-000382 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must only use ports, protocols, and services allowed per the Ports, Protocols, and Services Management (PPSM) Category Assurance List (CAL) and Vulnerability Assessments (VAs). In order to prevent unauthorized connection of devices, unauthorized transfer of information, or unauthorized tunneling (i.e., embedding of data types within data types), organizations must disable or restrict unused or unnecessary physical and logical ports/protocols on information systems. Voice video endpoints are capable of providing a wide variety of functions and services. Some of the functions and services provided by default may not be necessary to support essential organizational operations. Additionally, it is sometimes convenient to provide multiple services from a single component but doing so increases risk compared to limiting the services provided by any one component. To support the requirements and principles of least functionality, the network element must support the organizational requirements providing only essential capabilities and limiting the use of ports, protocols, and/or services to only those required, authorized, and approved to conduct official business or to address authorized quality of life issues. The current Category Assurance List (CAL) and Vulnerability Assessments (VA) listings for ports, protocols, and services are available on the DISA Information Assurance Support Environment (IASE) website for Ports, Protocols, and Services Management (PPSM) at http://iase.disa.mil/ppsm/Pages/index.aspx.
SV-81291r1_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00060 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint must be configured in accordance with the security configuration settings based on DoD security configuration or implementation guidance, including STIGs, NSA configuration guides, CTOs, and DTMs. Configuring the Voice Video Endpoint to implement organization-wide security implementation guides and security checklists ensures compliance with federal standards and establishes a common security baseline across DoD that reflects the most restrictive security posture consistent with operational requirements. Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed that affect the security posture and/or functionality of the network element. Security-related parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of the network element, including the parameters required to satisfy other security control requirements. For the network element, security-related parameters include settings for network traffic management configurations.
SV-81293r2_rule SRG-NET-000510-VVEP-00040 CCI-002450 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint processing unclassified information must implement NIST FIPS-validated cryptography to provision digital signatures. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of utilizing encryption to protect data. The network element must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated.
SV-82475r2_rule SRG-NET-000015-VVEP-00013 CCI-000213 HIGH The Voice Video Endpoint must register with a Voice Video Session Manager. Authentication must not automatically give an entity access to an asset. Authorization procedures and controls must be implemented to ensure each authenticated entity also has a validated and current authorization. Authorization is the process of determining whether an entity, once authenticated, is permitted to access a specific asset. Registration authenticates and authorizes endpoints with the Voice Video Session Manager. For most VoIP systems, registration is the process of centrally recording the user ID, endpoint MAC address, service/policy profile with 2 stage authentication prior to authorizing the establishment of the session and user service. The event of successful registration creates the session record immediately. VC systems register using a similar process with a gatekeeper. Without enforcing registration, an adversary could impersonate a legitimate device on the Voice Video network.
SV-86295r4_rule SRG-NET-000512-VVEP-00065 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint used for unclassified communication within a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) or Special Access Program Facility (SAPF) must be National Telecommunications Security Working Group (NTSWG)-approved device in accordance with the Committee on National Security Systems Instruction (CNSSI) 5000. Configuring the Voice Video Endpoint to implement CNSSI 5000 for unclassified communication within SCIFs and SAPF ensures compliance with federal standards and establishes a common security baseline across DoD that reflects the most restrictive security posture consistent with operational requirements. Voice Video Endpoints may transmit classified conversations over unclassified networks. Voice Video Endpoint microphones, speakers, and supporting electronics may pick up conversation audio within the area and conduct it over the network connection, even when the endpoint is on-hook, powered or not. The Technical Surveillance Counter-Measures (TSCM) program protects sensitive government information, to include classified information, through the establishment of on-hook audio security standards. Voice Video Endpoints certified by NTSWG are modified to prevent this behavior, or limit it to within acceptable levels. References: CNSS Instruction No. 5000, Guidelines for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), dated August 2016 CNSS Instruction No. 5001, Type-Acceptance Program for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Telephones, dated December 2007 CNSS Instruction No. 5007, Telephone Security Equipment Submission and Evaluation Procedures, dated April 2013 IC Tech Spec-For ICD/ICS 705, Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities, version 1.3 dated September 10, 2015 Joint Air Force, Army, Navy (JAFAN) 6/0 Manual; Special Access Program Security Manual – Revision 1, dated May 29, 2008 Joint Air Force, Army, Navy (JAFAN) 6/9 Manual; Physical Security Standards for Special Access Program Facilities, dated March 23, 2004
SV-91973r1_rule SRG-NET-000494-VVEP-00061 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint processing classified calls must produce session (call detail) records containing classification level and Security Access Level (SAL). Session records are commonly produced by session management and border elements. Many Voice Video Endpoints are not capable of providing session records and instead rely on session management and border elements. Voice video endpoints capable of producing session records provide supplemental confirmation of monitored events. Voice video endpoints that communicate beyond these defined environments must generate session records. Session record content for classified calls may include additional information not pertinent to unclassified calls, such as the classification and SAL. Detailed records are typically produced by the session manager but can be augmented by non-telephone endpoint records.
SV-91977r1_rule SRG-NET-000311-VVEP-00062 CCI-002263 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint processing classified calls must be properly marked with the highest security level of the information being processed. Without the association of security attributes to information, there is no basis for the network element to make security related access-control and flow-control decisions. Security attributes includes marking data as classified or FOUO. These security attributes may be assigned manually or during data processing but either way, it is imperative these assignments are maintained while the data is in process. If the security attributes are lost when the data is being processed, there is the risk of a data compromise. All hardware Voice Video endpoints processing classified calls, including phones and terminals, must be properly marked with the highest class-mark of the system. (Formerly DRSN 1098).
SV-91979r1_rule SRG-NET-000311-VVEP-00063 CCI-002263 MEDIUM The Voice Video Endpoint processing classified calls must display the classification level and Security Access Level (SAL) for the call or conference in progress. Without the association of security attributes to information, there is no basis for the network element to make security related access-control and flow-control decisions. Security attributes includes marking data as classified or FOUO. These security attributes may be assigned manually or during data processing but either way, it is imperative these assignments are maintained while the data is in process. If the security attributes are lost when the data is being processed, there is the risk of a data compromise. Voice video endpoints processing classified calls must display the appropriate security classification and SAL to ensure users protect information accordingly. Further, endpoints must be compatible with STU-III and STE displays. Voice video endpoints must indicate: - SCI when the connected terminals are authorized to process SCI information - Foreign national presence when non-U.S. personnel are authorized uncontrolled access - Terminal identifier associated with distant STU-IIIs or STEs and RED switch subscriber terminals - Non-secure calls and conferences established through an unclassified switch or key system. Note: Each DRSN RED telephone (except for the IST) must have, at a minimum, a two-line alphanumeric display with a minimum of 16-characters per line. The Integrated Services Telephone (IST) has a one-line, 40-character display instead of the two-line by 16-character display. These displays will show the following: - The first line will display the self-authenticating security level of the call or conference in progress. - The second line will display the identity data of the distant terminal or identify the network and/or equipment type associated with the distant party and when a conference call is in progress. (Formerly DRSN 2384/2385)
SV-93761r1_rule SRG-NET-000041-VVEP-00064 MEDIUM The hardware Voice Video Endpoint must have a physical DD 2056 affixed, or display a digital representation. Display of a standardized and approved use notification before granting access to the network ensures privacy and security notification verbiage used is consistent with applicable federal laws, Executive Orders, directives, policies, regulations, standards, and guidance. Consent to monitoring stickers.