DBN-6300 NDM Security Technical Implementation Guide

U_DBN-6300_NDM_STIG_V1R1_Manual-xccdf.xml

This Security Technical Implementation Guide is published as a tool to improve the security of Department of Defense (DoD) information systems. The requirements are derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 and related documents. Comments or proposed revisions to this document should be sent via e-mail to the following address: [email protected]
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Version / Release: V1R1

Published: 2017-09-15

Updated At: 2018-09-23 19:12:47

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Drop CKL or SCAP (XCCDF) results here.
    Vuln Rule Version CCI Severity Title Description Status Finding Details Comments
    SV-79465r1_rule DBNW-DM-000006 CCI-000015 HIGH The DBN-6300 must provide automated support for account management functions. If account management functions are not automatically enforced, an attacker could gain privileged access to a vital element of the network security architecture.
    SV-79473r1_rule DBNW-DM-000009 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must automatically audit account creation. Upon gaining access to a network device, an attacker will often first attempt to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is to create a new account. This control does not apply to the account of last resort or root account. DoD prohibits local user accounts on the device, except for an account of last resort and (where applicable) a root account. With the DB-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-79475r1_rule DBNW-DM-000010 CCI-001403 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must automatically audit account modification. Upon gaining access to a network device, an attacker will often attempt to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is to modify an account. This control does not apply to the account of last resort or root account. DoD prohibits local user accounts on the device, except for an account of last resort and (where applicable) a root account. Account management functions include assignment of group or role membership; identifying account type; specifying user access authorizations (i.e., privileges); account removal, update, or termination; and administrative alerts. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-79477r1_rule DBNW-DM-000089 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must be compliant with at least one IETF Internet standard authentication protocol. Protecting access authorization information (i.e., access control decisions) ensures that authorization information cannot be altered, spoofed, or otherwise compromised during transmission. In distributed information systems, authorization processes and access control decisions may occur in separate parts of the systems. In such instances, authorization information is transmitted securely so timely access control decisions can be enforced at the appropriate locations. To support the access control decisions, it may be necessary to transmit, as part of the access authorization information, supporting security attributes. This is because, in distributed information systems, there are various access control decisions that need to be made, and different entities (e.g., services) make these decisions in a serial fashion, each requiring some security attributes to make the decisions.
    SV-79479r1_rule DBNW-DM-000012 CCI-001405 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must automatically audit account removal actions. Account management, as a whole, ensures access to the network device is being controlled in a secure manner by granting access to only authorized personnel. Auditing account removal actions will support account management procedures. When device management accounts are terminated, user or service accessibility may be affected. Auditing also ensures authorized active accounts remain enabled and available for use when required. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-79481r1_rule DBNW-DM-000015 CCI-000044 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must enforce the limit of three consecutive invalid logon attempts by a user during a 15-minute time period. By limiting the number of failed logon attempts, the risk of unauthorized system access via user password guessing, otherwise known as brute-forcing, is reduced. It is possible to set a time-to-retry variable, as well as number of retries during that lockout timeout variable, within the DBN-6300.
    SV-79483r1_rule DBNW-DM-000021 CCI-000166 LOW The DBN-6300 must protect against an individual (or process acting on behalf of an individual) falsely denying having performed organization-defined actions to be covered by non-repudiation. This requirement supports non-repudiation of actions taken by an administrator and is required in order to maintain the integrity of the configuration management process. All configuration changes to the network device are logged, and administrators authenticate with two-factor authentication before gaining administrative access. Together, these processes will ensure the administrators can be held accountable for the configuration changes they implement. To meet this requirement, the network device must log administrator access and activity. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-79485r1_rule DBNW-DM-000132 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit log events for a locally developed list of auditable events. Auditing and logging are key components of any security architecture. Logging the actions of specific events provides a means to investigate an attack; to recognize resource utilization or capacity thresholds; or to identify an improperly configured network device. If auditing is not comprehensive, it will not be useful for intrusion monitoring, security investigations, and forensic analysis. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-79487r1_rule DBNW-DM-000023 CCI-000169 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must provide audit record generation capability for DoD-defined auditable events within the DBN-6300. Without the capability to generate audit records, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., process, module). Certain specific device functionalities may be audited as well. The list of audited events is the set of events for which audits are to be generated. This set of events is typically a subset of the list of all events for which the system is capable of generating audit records. DoD has defined the list of events for which the device will provide an audit record generation capability as the following: (i) Successful and unsuccessful attempts to access, modify, or delete privileges, security objects, security levels, or categories of information (e.g., classification levels); (ii) Access actions, such as successful and unsuccessful logon attempts, privileged activities or other system level access, starting and ending time for user access to the system, concurrent logons from different workstations, successful and unsuccessful accesses to objects, all program initiations, and all direct access to the information system; and (iii) All account creation, modification, disabling, and termination actions. With the DB-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91623r1_rule DBNW-DM-000024 CCI-000171 LOW The DBN-6300 must allow only the ISSM (or individuals or roles appointed by the ISSM) to select which auditable events are to be generated and forwarded to the audit log. Without the capability to restrict which roles and individuals can select which events are audited, unauthorized personnel may be able to prevent the auditing of critical events. Misconfigured audits may degrade the system's performance by overwhelming the audit log. Misconfigured audits may also make it more difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one.
    SV-91625r1_rule DBNW-DM-000025 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate log records when successful attempts to access privileges occur. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). It is not possible to perform unsuccessful commands in the UI web management interface since it is a GUI interface. Unauthorized menu items/commands are not visible.
    SV-91627r1_rule DBNW-DM-000026 CCI-001464 LOW The DBN-6300 must initiate session auditing upon startup. If auditing is enabled late in the startup process, the actions of some start-up processes may not be audited. Some audit systems also maintain state information only available if auditing is enabled before a given process is created.
    SV-91629r1_rule DBNW-DM-000027 CCI-000130 LOW The DBN-6300 must produce audit log records containing sufficient information to establish what type of event occurred. It is essential for security personnel to know what is being done, what was attempted, where it was done, when it was done, and by whom it was done in order to compile an accurate risk assessment. Associating event types with detected events in the application and audit logs provides a means of investigating an attack, recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds, or identifying an improperly configured network device. Without this capability, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. Audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91631r1_rule DBNW-DM-000028 CCI-000131 LOW The DBN-6300 must produce audit records containing information to establish when (date and time) the events occurred. It is essential for security personnel to know what is being done, what was attempted, where it was done, when it was done, and by whom it was done in order to compile an accurate risk assessment. Logging the date and time of each detected event provides a means of investigating an attack, recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds, or identifying an improperly configured network device. In order to establish and correlate the series of events leading up to an outage or attack, it is imperative the date and time are recorded in all log records.
    SV-91633r1_rule DBNW-DM-000029 CCI-000132 LOW The DBN-6300 must produce audit records containing information to establish where the events occurred. In order to compile an accurate risk assessment and provide forensic analysis, it is essential for security personnel to know where events occurred, such as device hardware components, device software modules, session identifiers, filenames, host names, and functionality. Location of events includes hardware components, device software module, session identifiers, filenames, host names, and functionality.
    SV-91635r1_rule DBNW-DM-000030 CCI-000133 LOW The DBN-6300 must produce audit log records containing information to establish the source of events. In order to compile an accurate risk assessment and provide forensic analysis, it is essential for security personnel to know the source of the event. The source may be a component, module, or process within the device or an external session, administrator, or device. Location of events includes hardware components, device software module, processes within the device or external session, administrator ID, or device.
    SV-91637r1_rule DBNW-DM-000031 CCI-000134 LOW The DBN-6300 must produce audit records that contain information to establish the outcome of the event. Without information about the outcome of events, security personnel cannot make an accurate assessment as to whether an attack was successful or if changes were made to the security state of the system. Event outcomes can include indicators of event success or failure and event-specific results (e.g., the security state of the device after the event occurred). As such, they also provide a means to measure the impact of an event and help authorized personnel to determine the appropriate response.
    SV-91639r1_rule DBNW-DM-000032 CCI-001487 LOW The DBN-6300 must generate audit records containing information that establishes the identity of any individual or process associated with the event. Without information that establishes the identity of the subjects (i.e., administrators or processes acting on behalf of administrators) associated with the events, security personnel cannot determine responsibility for the potentially harmful event. Event identifiers (if authenticated or otherwise known) include but are not limited to user database tables, primary key values, user names, or process identifiers.
    SV-91641r1_rule DBNW-DM-000033 CCI-000135 LOW The DBN-6300 must generate audit records containing the full-text recording of privileged commands. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. Organizations consider limiting the additional audit information to only that information explicitly needed for specific audit requirements. The additional information required is dependent on the type of information (i.e., sensitivity of the data and the environment in which it resides). At a minimum, the organization must audit full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise.
    SV-91643r1_rule DBNW-DM-000036 CCI-000159 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must use internal system clocks to generate time stamps for audit records. In order to determine what is happening within the network infrastructure or to resolve and trace an attack, the network device must support the organization's capability to correlate the audit log data from multiple network devices to acquire a clear understanding of events. In order to correlate auditable events, time stamps are needed on all of the log records. If the internal clock is not used, the system may not be able to provide time stamps for log messages. Additionally, externally generated time stamps may not be accurate. Applications can use the capability of an operating system or purpose-built module for this purpose. (Note that the internal clock is required to be synchronized with authoritative time sources by other requirements.)
    SV-91645r1_rule DBNW-DM-000043 CCI-001348 LOW The DBN-6300 must back up audit records at least every seven days onto a different system or system component than the system or component being audited. Protection of log data includes assuring log data is not accidentally lost or deleted. Regularly backing up audit records to a different system or onto separate media than the system being audited helps to ensure that, in the event of a catastrophic system failure, the audit records will be retained. Backup of audit records helps to ensure that a compromise of the information system being audited does not also result in a compromise of the audit records. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91647r1_rule DBNW-DM-000049 CCI-001358 HIGH The DBN-6300 must uniquely identify and authenticate organizational administrators (or processes acting on behalf of organizational administrators). To ensure accountability and prevent unauthenticated access, organizational administrators must be uniquely identified and authenticated for all network management accesses to prevent potential misuse and compromise of the system.
    SV-91649r1_rule DBNW-DM-000050 CCI-000765 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must use multifactor authentication for network access (remote and nonlocal) to privileged accounts. Multifactor authentication requires using two or more factors to achieve authentication. Factors include: (i) something a user knows (e.g., password/PIN); (ii) something a user has (e.g., cryptographic identification device, token); or (iii) something a user is (e.g., biometric). Network access is defined as access to an information system by a user (or a process acting on behalf of a user) communicating through a network (e.g., LAN, WAN, or the Internet). DoD has mandated the use of the Common Access Card (CAC) token/credential to support identity management and personal authentication for systems covered under HSPD 12. DoD recommended architecture for network devices is for system administrators to authenticate using an authentication server using the DoD CAC credential with DoD-approved PKI. This requirement also applies to the account of last resort and the root account only if non-local access via the network is enabled for these accounts (not recommended). This control does not apply to the account of last resort or root account. DoD prohibits local user accounts on the device, except for an account of last resort and (where applicable) a root account.
    SV-91651r1_rule DBNW-DM-000051 CCI-000767 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must use multifactor authentication for local access to privileged accounts. Multifactor authentication is defined as using two or more factors to achieve authentication. Factors include: (i) Something a user knows (e.g., password/PIN); (ii) Something a user has (e.g., cryptographic identification device, token); or (iii) Something a user is (e.g., biometric). To ensure accountability and prevent unauthenticated access, privileged users must utilize multifactor authentication to prevent potential misuse and compromise of the system. Local access is defined as access to an organizational information system by a user (or process acting on behalf of a user) communicating through a direct connection without the use of a network. Applications integrating with the DoD Active Directory and utilizing the DoD CAC are examples of compliant multifactor authentication solutions. This control does not apply to the account of last resort or root account. DoD prohibits local user accounts on the device, except for an account of last resort and (where applicable) a root account.
    SV-91653r1_rule DBNW-DM-000053 CCI-001941 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must implement replay-resistant authentication mechanisms for network access to privileged accounts. A replay attack may enable an unauthorized user to gain access to the application. Authentication sessions between the authenticator and the application validating the user credentials must not be vulnerable to a replay attack. An authentication process resists replay attacks if it is impractical to achieve a successful authentication by recording and replaying a previous authentication message. Techniques used to address this include protocols using nonces (e.g., numbers generated for a specific one-time use) or challenges (e.g., TLS, WS_Security). Additional techniques include time-synchronous or challenge-response one-time authenticators.
    SV-91655r1_rule DBNW-DM-000055 CCI-000205 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must enforce a minimum 15-character password length. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password length is one factor of several that helps to determine strength and how long it takes to crack a password. Since the device cannot be configured for password complexity, not having a strong password can result in the success of a brute force attack, which would give immediate access to a privileged system.
    SV-91657r1_rule DBNW-DM-000056 CCI-000200 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must prohibit password reuse for a minimum of five generations. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. To meet password policy requirements, passwords need to be changed at specific policy-based intervals. If the network device allows the user to consecutively reuse their password when that password has exceeded its defined lifetime, the end result is a password that is not changed as per policy requirements.
    SV-91659r1_rule DBNW-DM-000057 CCI-000192 MEDIUM If multifactor authentication is not supported and passwords must be used, the DBN-6300 must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one upper-case character be used. Use of a complex passwords helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determine how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password is, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
    SV-91661r1_rule DBNW-DM-000058 CCI-000193 MEDIUM If multifactor authentication is not supported and passwords must be used, the DBN-6300 must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one lower-case character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determine how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
    SV-91663r1_rule DBNW-DM-000059 CCI-000194 MEDIUM If multifactor authentication is not supported and passwords must be used, the DBN-6300 must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one numeric character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determine how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
    SV-91665r1_rule DBNW-DM-000060 CCI-001619 MEDIUM If multifactor authentication is not supported and passwords must be used, the DBN-6300 must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one special character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determine how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
    SV-91667r1_rule DBNW-DM-000064 CCI-000198 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must enforce 24 hours/1 day as the minimum password lifetime. Enforcing a minimum password lifetime helps prevent repeated password changes to defeat the password reuse or history enforcement requirement. Restricting this setting limits the user's ability to change their password. Passwords need to be changed at specific policy-based intervals; however, if the network device allows the user to immediately and continually change their password, then the password could be repeatedly changed in a short period of time to defeat the organization's policy regarding password reuse.
    SV-91669r1_rule DBNW-DM-000065 CCI-000199 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must enforce a 60-day maximum password lifetime restriction. Any password, no matter how complex, can eventually be cracked. Therefore, passwords need to be changed at specific intervals. One method of minimizing this risk is to use complex passwords and periodically change them. If the network device does not limit the lifetime of passwords and force users to change their passwords, there is the risk that the passwords could be compromised. This requirement does not include emergency administration accounts which are meant for access to the network device in case of failure. These accounts are not required to have maximum password lifetime restrictions.
    SV-91671r1_rule DBNW-DM-000071 CCI-001133 HIGH The DBN-6300 must terminate all network connections associated with a device management session at the end of the session, or the session must be terminated after 10 minutes of inactivity except to fulfill documented and validated mission requirements. Terminating an idle session within a short time period reduces the window of opportunity for unauthorized personnel to take control of a management session enabled on the console or console port that has been left unattended. In addition, quickly terminating an idle session will also free up resources committed by the managed network element. Terminating network connections associated with communications sessions includes, for example, deallocating associated TCP/IP address/port pairs at the operating system level or deallocating networking assignments at the application level if multiple application sessions are using a single, operating system-level network connection. This does not mean that the device terminates all sessions or network access; it only ends the inactive session and releases the resources associated with that session.
    SV-91673r1_rule DBNW-DM-000077 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must reveal error messages only to authorized individuals (ISSO, ISSM, and SA). Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state. Additionally, sensitive account information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The DBN-6300 will reveal error messages only to authorized individuals (ISSO, ISSM, and SA). Only privileged users have visibility into any error messages. The audit log requires authorized users to log on to obtain visibility. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91675r1_rule DBNW-DM-000078 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must activate a system alert message, send an alarm, and/or automatically shut down when a component failure is detected. Predictable failure prevention requires organizational planning to address device failure issues. If components key to maintaining the device's security fail to function, the device could continue operating in a nonsecure state. If appropriate actions are not taken when a network device failure occurs, a denial-of-service condition may occur that could result in mission failure because the network would be operating without a critical security monitoring and prevention function. Upon detecting a failure of network device security components, the network device must activate a system alert message, send an alarm, or shut down. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91677r1_rule DBNW-DM-000083 CCI-002361 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must automatically terminate a network administrator session after organization-defined conditions or trigger events requiring session disconnect. Automatic session termination addresses the termination of administrator-initiated logical sessions in contrast to the termination of network connections that are associated with communications sessions (i.e., network disconnect). A logical session (for local, network, and remote access) is initiated whenever an administrator (or process acting on behalf of a user) accesses a network device. Such administrator sessions can be terminated (and thus terminate network administrator access) without terminating network sessions. Session termination terminates all processes associated with an administrator's logical session except those processes that are specifically created by the administrator (i.e., session owner) to continue after the session is terminated. Conditions or trigger events requiring automatic session termination can include, for example, organization-defined periods of user inactivity, targeted responses to certain types of incidents, and time-of-day restrictions on information system use. These conditions will vary across environments and network device types.
    SV-91679r1_rule DBNW-DM-000087 CCI-002130 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must automatically audit account enabling actions. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply enable a new or disabled account. Notification of account enabling is one method for mitigating this risk. A comprehensive account management process will ensure an audit trail that documents the creation of application user accounts and notifies administrators and ISSOs. Such a process greatly reduces the risk that accounts will be surreptitiously created and provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91681r1_rule DBNW-DM-000093 CCI-002234 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must audit the execution of privileged functions. Misuse of privileged functions, either intentionally or unintentionally by authorized users, or by unauthorized external entities that have compromised information system accounts, is a serious and ongoing concern and can have significant adverse impacts on organizations. Auditing the use of privileged functions is one way to detect such misuse and identify the risk from insider threats and the advanced persistent threat. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91683r1_rule DBNW-DM-000096 CCI-001914 LOW The DBN-6300 must provide the capability for organization-identified individuals or roles to change the auditing to be performed based on all selectable event criteria within near real time. If authorized individuals do not have the ability to modify auditing parameters in response to a changing threat environment, the organization may not be able to effectively respond, and important forensic information may be lost. This requirement enables organizations to extend or limit auditing as necessary to meet organizational requirements. Auditing that is limited to conserve information system resources may be extended to address certain threat situations. In addition, auditing may be limited to a specific set of events to facilitate audit reduction, analysis, and reporting. Organizations can establish time thresholds in which audit actions are changed, for example, near-real-time, within minutes, or within hours. The individuals or roles to change the auditing are dependent on the security configuration of the network device. For example, it may be configured to allow only some administrators to change the auditing, while other administrators can review audit logs but not reconfigure auditing. Because this capability is so powerful, organizations should be extremely cautious about only granting this capability to fully authorized security personnel. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91685r1_rule DBNW-DM-000100 CCI-001891 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must compare internal information system clocks at least every 24 hours with an authoritative time server. Inaccurate time stamps make it more difficult to correlate events and can lead to an inaccurate analysis. Determining the correct time a particular event occurred on a system is critical when conducting forensic analysis and investigating system events. Sources outside of the configured acceptable allowance (drift) may be inaccurate. Additionally, unnecessary synchronization may have an adverse impact on system performance and may indicate malicious activity. Synchronizing internal information system clocks provides uniformity of time stamps for information systems with multiple system clocks and systems connected over a network.
    SV-91687r1_rule DBNW-DM-000101 CCI-002046 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must synchronize its internal system clock to the NTP server when the time difference is greater than one second. Inaccurate time stamps make it more difficult to correlate events and can lead to an inaccurate analysis. Determining the correct time a particular event occurred on a system is critical when conducting forensic analysis and investigating system events. Synchronizing internal information system clocks provides uniformity of time stamps for information systems with multiple system clocks and systems connected over a network. Organizations should consider setting time periods for different types of systems (e.g., financial, legal, or mission-critical systems). Organizations should also consider endpoints that may not have regular access to the authoritative time server (e.g., mobile, teleworking, and tactical endpoints). This requirement is related to the comparison done every 24 hours in CCI-001891 because a comparison must be done in order to determine the time difference. The organization-defined time period will depend on multiple factors, most notably the granularity of time stamps in audit logs. For example, if time stamps only show to the nearest second, there is no need to have accuracy of a tenth of a second in clocks.
    SV-91689r1_rule DBNW-DM-000103 CCI-001890 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must record time stamps for audit records that can be mapped to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). If time stamps are not consistently applied and there is no common time reference, it is difficult to perform forensic analysis.
    SV-91691r1_rule DBNW-DM-000104 CCI-001889 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must record time stamps for audit records that meet a granularity of one second for a minimum degree of precision. Without sufficient granularity of time stamps, it is not possible to adequately determine the chronological order of records. Time stamps generated by the application include date and time. Granularity of time measurements refers to the degree of synchronization between information system clocks and reference clocks.
    SV-91693r1_rule DBNW-DM-000108 CCI-001814 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must audit the enforcement actions used to restrict access associated with changes to the device. Without auditing the enforcement of access restrictions against changes to the device configuration, it will be difficult to identify attempted attacks, and an audit trail will not be available for forensic investigation for after-the-fact actions. Enforcement actions are the methods or mechanisms used to prevent unauthorized changes to configuration settings. Enforcement action methods may be as simple as denying access to a file based on the application of file permissions (access restriction). Audit items may consist of lists of actions blocked by access restrictions or changes identified after the fact. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91695r1_rule DBNW-DM-000117 CCI-002890 MEDIUM Applications used for nonlocal maintenance sessions must implement cryptographic mechanisms to protect the integrity of nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic communications. This requires the use of secure protocols instead of their unsecured counterparts, such as SSH instead of telnet, SCP instead of FTP, and HTTPS instead of HTTP. If unsecured protocols (lacking cryptographic mechanisms) are used for sessions, the contents of those sessions will be susceptible to manipulation, potentially allowing alteration and hijacking of maintenance sessions.
    SV-91697r1_rule DBNW-DM-000118 CCI-003123 MEDIUM Applications used for nonlocal maintenance sessions must implement cryptographic mechanisms to protect the confidentiality of nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic communications. This requires the use of secure protocols instead of their unsecured counterparts, such as SSH instead of telnet, SCP instead of FTP, and HTTPS instead of HTTP. If unsecured protocols (lacking cryptographic mechanisms) are used for sessions, the contents of those sessions will be susceptible to eavesdropping, potentially putting sensitive data (including administrator passwords) at risk of compromise and potentially allowing hijacking of maintenance sessions.
    SV-91699r1_rule DBNW-DM-000121 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful attempts to modify administrator privileges occur. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). Administrative roles cannot be changed on the device console; thus, this only applies to the User Interface (UI) web management tool. All account activities (creation, modification, disabling, and removal, and other account activities, including successful/unsuccessful attempts to modify administrator privileges) on the DBN-6300 are written out to an audit log. This log carries a wealth of information that provides valuable forensic help, including the origin IP and port and destination and port where the event occurred, as well as the type of event and when it occurred. This data is all used to help establish the identity of any individual or process associated with the event. This can be verified by accessing the audit logs remotely by downloading the System State Report. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91701r1_rule DBNW-DM-000122 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful attempts to delete administrator privileges occur. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91703r1_rule DBNW-DM-000123 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful logon attempts occur. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300 Audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91705r1_rule DBNW-DM-000124 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records for privileged activities or other system-level access. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91707r1_rule DBNW-DM-000125 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records showing starting and ending time for administrator access to the system. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91709r1_rule DBNW-DM-000126 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records when concurrent logons from different workstations occur. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91711r1_rule DBNW-DM-000127 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must generate audit records for all account creation, modification, disabling, and termination events. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the network device (e.g., module or policy filter). With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91713r1_rule DBNW-DM-000128 CCI-001851 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must off-load audit records onto a different system or media than the system being audited. Off-loading ensures audit information does not get overwritten if the limited audit storage capacity is reached and also protects the audit record in case the system/component being audited is compromised. The intent of this control is to ensure that log information does not get overwritten if the limited log storage capacity is reached and also to protect the log records in general if the system/component being logged is compromised (hence the notion of off-loading onto a different system or media) but the intent is not to hold the information in more than one or multiple locations. This requirement is intended to address the primary repository, which is on the centralized Syslog server. This requirement is only applicable to the server used as the Syslog server. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91715r1_rule DBNW-DM-000142 CCI-000366 HIGH The DBN-6300 must be configured to send log data to a syslog server for the purpose of forwarding alerts to the administrators and the ISSO. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create a new account. Notification of account creation is one method for mitigating this risk. A comprehensive account management process will ensure an audit trail that documents the creation of accounts and notifies administrators and ISSOs. Such a process greatly reduces the risk that accounts will be surreptitiously created and provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. With the DBN-6300, audit records are automatically backed up on a real-time basis via syslog when enabled.
    SV-91717r1_rule DBNW-DM-000134 CCI-000366 MEDIUM Accounts for device management must be configured on the authentication server and not the network device itself, except for the account of last resort. Centralized management of authentication settings increases the security of remote and nonlocal access methods. This control is particularly important protection against the insider threat. With robust centralized management, audit records for administrator account access to the organization's network devices can be more readily analyzed for trends and anomalies. The alternative method of defining administrator accounts on each device exposes the device configuration to remote access authentication attacks and system administrators with multiple authenticators for each network device.
    SV-91719r1_rule DBNW-DM-000141 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The DBN-6300 must obtain its public key certificates from an appropriate certificate policy through an approved service provider. For user certificates, each organization obtains certificates from an approved, shared service provider, as required by OMB policy. For federal agencies operating a legacy public key infrastructure cross-certified with the Federal Bridge Certification Authority at medium assurance or higher, this Certification Authority will suffice. Self-signed certificates are not allowed.