SLES 12 STIG SCAP Benchmark
V002.009R2 2023-03-06       U_SLES_12_V2R9_STIG_SCAP_1-2_Benchmark.xml
This Security Technical Implementation Guide is published as a tool to improve the security of Department of Defense (DOD) information systems. The requirements are derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 and related documents. Comments or proposed revisions to this document should be sent via email to the following address: [email protected].
Vuln Rule Version CCI Severity Title Description
SV-217101r603262_rule SLES-12-010000 CCI-001230 HIGH The SUSE operating system must be a vendor-supported release. A SUSE operating system release is considered "supported" if the vendor continues to provide security patches for the product. With an unsupported release, it will not be possible to resolve security issues discovered in the system software.
SV-217108r603262_rule SLES-12-010070 CCI-000060 LOW The SUSE operating system must utilize vlock to allow for session locking. A session lock is a temporary action taken when a user stops work and moves away from the immediate physical vicinity of the information system but does not want to log out because of the temporary nature of the absence. The session lock is implemented at the point where session activity can be determined. Regardless of where the session lock is determined and implemented, once invoked, the session lock must remain in place until the user reauthenticates. No other activity aside from reauthentication must unlock the system. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000028-GPOS-00009, SRG-OS-000030-GPOS-00011, SRG-OS-000031-GPOS-00012
SV-217112r854084_rule SLES-12-010110 CCI-002038 HIGH The SUSE operating system must reauthenticate users when changing authenticators, roles, or escalating privileges. Without reauthentication, users may access resources or perform tasks for which they do not have authorization. When SUSE operating system provide the capability to change user authenticators, change security roles, or escalate a functional capability, it is critical the user reauthenticate. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00156, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00157, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00158
SV-217113r902834_rule SLES-12-010120 CCI-000054 LOW The SUSE operating system must limit the number of concurrent sessions to 10 for all accounts and/or account types. SUSE operating system management includes the ability to control the number of users and user sessions that utilize a SUSE operating system. Limiting the number of allowed users and sessions per user is helpful in reducing the risks related to Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks. This requirement addresses concurrent sessions for information system accounts and does not address concurrent sessions by single users via multiple system accounts. The maximum number of concurrent sessions should be defined based on mission needs and the operational environment for each system.
SV-217116r603262_rule SLES-12-010140 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must enforce a delay of at least four (4) seconds between logon prompts following a failed logon attempt. Limiting the number of logon attempts over a certain time interval reduces the chances that an unauthorized user may gain access to an account.
SV-217122r646689_rule SLES-12-010210 CCI-000803 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must employ FIPS 140-2 approved cryptographic hashing algorithm for system authentication (login.defs). Unapproved mechanisms that are used for authentication to the cryptographic module are not verified and therefore cannot be relied on to provide confidentiality or integrity, and DoD data may be compromised. SUSE operating systems using encryption are required to use FIPS-compliant mechanisms for authenticating to cryptographic modules. FIPS 140-2 is the current standard for validating that mechanisms used to access cryptographic modules use authentication that meets DoD requirements. This allows for Security Levels 1, 2, 3, or 4 for use on a general purpose computing system.
SV-217123r877397_rule SLES-12-010220 CCI-000803 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must employ FIPS 140-2-approved cryptographic hashing algorithms for all stored passwords. The system must use a strong hashing algorithm to store the password. The system must use a sufficient number of hashing rounds to ensure the required level of entropy. Passwords need to be protected at all times, and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000073-GPOS-00041, SRG-OS-000120-GPOS-00061
SV-217126r877397_rule SLES-12-010240 CCI-000803 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must employ FIPS 140-2-approved cryptographic hashing algorithms for all stored passwords. The system must use a strong hashing algorithm to store the password. The system must use a sufficient number of hashing rounds to ensure the required level of entropy. Passwords need to be protected at all times, and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000073-GPOS-00041, SRG-OS-000120-GPOS-00061
SV-217128r646695_rule SLES-12-010260 CCI-000198 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must be configured to create or update passwords with a minimum lifetime of 24 hours (one day). Enforcing a minimum password lifetime helps prevent repeated password changes to defeat the password reuse or history enforcement requirement. If users are allowed to immediately and continually change their password, the password could be repeatedly changed in a short period of time to defeat the organization's policy regarding password reuse.
SV-217129r646698_rule SLES-12-010270 CCI-000198 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must employ user passwords with a minimum lifetime of 24 hours (one day). Enforcing a minimum password lifetime helps prevent repeated password changes to defeat the password reuse or history enforcement requirement. If users are allowed to immediately and continually change their password, the password could be repeatedly changed in a short period of time to defeat the organization's policy regarding password reuse.
SV-217130r646701_rule SLES-12-010280 CCI-000199 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must be configured to create or update passwords with a maximum lifetime of 60 days. Any password, no matter how complex, can eventually be cracked. Therefore, passwords need to be changed periodically. If the SUSE operating system does not limit the lifetime of passwords and force users to change their passwords, there is the risk that the SUSE operating system passwords could be compromised.
SV-217131r646704_rule SLES-12-010290 CCI-000199 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must employ user passwords with a maximum lifetime of 60 days. Any password, no matter how complex, can eventually be cracked. Therefore, passwords need to be changed periodically. If the SUSE operating system does not limit the lifetime of passwords and force users to change their passwords, there is the risk that the SUSE operating system passwords could be compromised.
SV-217139r877377_rule SLES-12-010380 CCI-000366 HIGH The SUSE operating system must not allow unattended or automatic logon via the graphical user interface. Failure to restrict system access to authenticated users negatively impacts SUSE operating system security.
SV-217141r603262_rule SLES-12-010400 CCI-000366 HIGH There must be no .shosts files on the SUSE operating system. The .shosts files are used to configure host-based authentication for individual users or the system via SSH. Host-based authentication is not sufficient for preventing unauthorized access to the system, as it does not require interactive identification and authentication of a connection request, or for the use of two-factor authentication.
SV-217142r603262_rule SLES-12-010410 CCI-000366 HIGH There must be no shosts.equiv files on the SUSE operating system. The shosts.equiv files are used to configure host-based authentication for the system via SSH. Host-based authentication is not sufficient for preventing unauthorized access to the system, as it does not require interactive identification and authentication of a connection request, or for the use of two-factor authentication.
SV-217143r877466_rule SLES-12-010420 CCI-002450 MEDIUM FIPS 140-2 mode must be enabled on the SUSE operating system. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of using encryption to protect data. The SUSE operating system must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000396-GPOS-00176, SRG-OS-000478-GPOS-00223
SV-217161r603262_rule SLES-12-010620 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system default permissions must be defined in such a way that all authenticated users can only read and modify their own files. Setting the most restrictive default permissions ensures that when new accounts are created, they do not have unnecessary access.
SV-217164r603262_rule SLES-12-010650 CCI-000366 HIGH The SUSE operating system root account must be the only account having unrestricted access to the system. If an account other than root also has a User Identifier (UID) of "0", it has root authority, giving that account unrestricted access to the entire SUSE operating system. Multiple accounts with a UID of "0" afford an opportunity for potential intruders to guess a password for a privileged account.
SV-217171r603262_rule SLES-12-010720 CCI-000366 MEDIUM All SUSE operating system local interactive user accounts, upon creation, must be assigned a home directory. If local interactive users are not assigned a valid home directory, there is no place for the storage and control of files they should own.
SV-217180r603262_rule SLES-12-010810 CCI-000366 MEDIUM SUSE operating system file systems that are being imported via Network File System (NFS) must be mounted to prevent files with the setuid and setgid bit set from being executed. The "nosuid" mount option causes the system to not execute "setuid" and "setgid" files with owner privileges. This option must be used for mounting any file system not containing approved "setuid" and "setguid" files. Executing files from untrusted file systems increases the opportunity for unprivileged users to attain unauthorized administrative access.
SV-217181r603262_rule SLES-12-010820 CCI-000366 MEDIUM SUSE operating system file systems that are being imported via Network File System (NFS) must be mounted to prevent binary files from being executed. The "noexec" mount option causes the system to not execute binary files. This option must be used for mounting any file system not containing approved binary files as they may be incompatible. Executing files from untrusted file systems increases the opportunity for unprivileged users to attain unauthorized administrative access.
SV-217185r603262_rule SLES-12-010860 CCI-000366 LOW The SUSE operating system must use a separate file system for /var. The use of separate file systems for different paths can protect the system from failures resulting from a file system becoming full or failing.
SV-217190r877036_rule SLES-12-020000 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have the auditing package installed. Without establishing what type of events occurred, the source of events, where events occurred, and the outcome of events, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. Audit record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, time stamps, source and destination addresses, user/process identifiers, event descriptions, success/fail indications, filenames involved, and access control or flow control rules invoked. Associating event types with detected events in the SUSE operating system audit logs provides a means of investigating an attack, recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds, or identifying an improperly configured SUSE operating system. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000337-GPOS-00129, SRG-OS-000348-GPOS-00136, SRG-OS-000349-GPOS-00137, SRG-OS-000350-GPOS-00138, SRG-OS-000351-GPOS-00139, SRG-OS-000352-GPOS-00140, SRG-OS-000353-GPOS-00141, SRG-OS-000354-GPOS-00142, SRG-OS-000358-GPOS-00145, SRG-OS-000359-GPOS-00146, SRG-OS-000365-GPOS-00152, SRG-OS-000474-GPOS-00219, SRG-OS-000475-GPOS-00220
SV-217191r854099_rule SLES-12-020010 CCI-000366 MEDIUM SUSE operating system audit records must contain information to establish what type of events occurred, the source of events, where events occurred, and the outcome of events. Without establishing what type of events occurred, the source of events, where events occurred, and the outcome of events, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. Audit record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, time stamps, source and destination addresses, user/process identifiers, event descriptions, success/fail indications, filenames involved, and access control or flow control rules invoked. Associating event types with detected events in the SUSE operating system audit logs provides a means of investigating an attack, recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds, or identifying an improperly configured SUSE operating system. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000038-GPOS-00016, SRG-OS-000039-GPOS-00017, SRG-OS-000040-GPOS-00018, SRG-OS-000041-GPOS-00019, SRG-OS-000042-GPOS-00021, SRG-OS-000051-GPOS-00024, SRG-OS-000054-GPOS-00025, SRG-OS-000122-GPOS-00063, SRG-OS-000254-GPOS-00095, SRG-OS-000255-GPOS-00096, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000480-GPOS-00227
SV-217197r877390_rule SLES-12-020070 CCI-001851 MEDIUM The audit-audispd-plugins must be installed on the SUSE operating system. Information stored in one location is vulnerable to accidental or incidental deletion or alteration. Off-loading is a common process in information systems with limited audit storage capacity.
SV-217205r854107_rule SLES-12-020200 CCI-001403 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/passwd. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply create a new account. Auditing of account creation mitigates this risk. To address access requirements, many SUSE operating systems may be integrated with enterprise-level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000304-GPOS-00121, SRG-OS-000470-GPOS-00214, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-217206r854108_rule SLES-12-020210 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/group. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply create a new account. Auditing of account creation mitigates this risk. To address access requirements, many SUSE operating systems may be integrated with enterprise-level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-217207r854109_rule SLES-12-020220 CCI-001403 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/shadow. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply create a new account. Auditing of account creation mitigates this risk. To address access requirements, many SUSE operating systems may be integrated with enterprise-level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-217208r854110_rule SLES-12-020230 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/opasswd. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply create a new account. Auditing of account creation mitigates this risk. To address access requirements, many SUSE operating systems may be integrated with enterprise-level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-217209r854111_rule SLES-12-020240 CCI-001877 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the privileged functions. Misuse of privileged functions, either intentionally or unintentionally by authorized users, or by unauthorized external entities that have compromised information system accounts, is a serious and ongoing concern and can have significant adverse impacts on organizations. Auditing the use of privileged functions is one way to detect such misuse and identify the risk from insider threats and the advanced persistent threat. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000327-GPOS-00127, SRG-OS-000337-GPOS-00129, SRG-OS-000348-GPOS-00136, SRG-OS-000349-GPOS-00137, SRG-OS-000350-GPOS-00138, SRG-OS-000351-GPOS-00139, SRG-OS-000352-GPOS-00140, SRG-OS-000353-GPOS-00141, SRG-OS-000354-GPOS-00142, SRG-OS-000358-GPOS-00145, SRG-OS-000359-GPOS-00146, SRG-OS-000365-GPOS-00152
SV-217210r854112_rule SLES-12-020250 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the su command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217211r854113_rule SLES-12-020260 CCI-000169 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the sudo command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217212r854114_rule SLES-12-020280 CCI-000172 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chfn command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217213r854115_rule SLES-12-020290 CCI-000169 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the mount command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217214r854116_rule SLES-12-020300 CCI-000130 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the umount command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217215r854117_rule SLES-12-020310 CCI-000169 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the ssh-agent command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217216r854118_rule SLES-12-020320 CCI-000130 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the ssh-keysign command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217217r854119_rule SLES-12-020360 CCI-000169 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the kmod command. Without the capability to generate audit records, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The list of audited events is the set of events for which audits are to be generated. This set of events is typically a subset of the list of all events for which the system is capable of generating audit records. DoD has defined the following list of events for which the SUSE operating system will provide an audit record generation capability: 1) Successful and unsuccessful attempts to access, modify, or delete privileges, security objects, security levels, or categories of information (e.g., classification levels); 2) Access actions, such as successful and unsuccessful logon attempts, privileged activities or other system-level access, starting and ending time for user access to the system, concurrent logons from different workstations, successful and unsuccessful accesses to objects, all program initiations, and all direct access to the information system; 3) All account creations, modifications, disabling, and terminations; and 4) All kernel module load, unload, and restart actions. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217218r854121_rule SLES-12-020370 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the setxattr, fsetxattr, lsetxattr, removexattr, fremovexattr, and lremovexattr syscalls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall made by all programs on the system. Therefore, it is very important to use syscall rules only when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, however, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217223r854124_rule SLES-12-020420 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chown, fchown, fchownat, and lchown syscalls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall made by all programs on the system. Therefore, it is very important to use syscall rules only when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, however, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217227r854126_rule SLES-12-020460 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chmod, fchmod, and fchmodat system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall made by all programs on the system. Therefore, it is very important to use syscall rules only when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, however, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217230r861099_rule SLES-12-020490 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the creat, open, openat, open_by_handle_at, truncate, and ftruncate syscalls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall made by all programs on the system. Therefore, it is very important to use syscall rules only when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, however, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217236r854130_rule SLES-12-020550 CCI-000172 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the passwd command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217237r854131_rule SLES-12-020560 CCI-000130 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the gpasswd command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217238r854132_rule SLES-12-020570 CCI-000169 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the newgrp command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217239r854133_rule SLES-12-020580 CCI-000130 LOW The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for a uses of the chsh command. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. At a minimum, the organization must audit the full-text recording of privileged commands. The organization must maintain audit trails in sufficient detail to reconstruct events to determine the cause and impact of compromise. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217240r854134_rule SLES-12-020590 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/gshadow. Once an attacker establishes initial access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to simply create a new account. Auditing of account creation mitigates this risk. To address access requirements, many SUSE operating systems may be integrated with enterprise-level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-217241r854135_rule SLES-12-020600 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chmod command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217242r854136_rule SLES-12-020610 CCI-000169 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the setfacl command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217243r854137_rule SLES-12-020620 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chacl command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217244r854138_rule SLES-12-020630 CCI-000172 MEDIUM Successful/unsuccessful attempts to modify categories of information (e.g., classification levels) must generate audit records. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217245r854139_rule SLES-12-020640 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the rm command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217246r854140_rule SLES-12-020650 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all modifications to the tallylog file must generate an audit record. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215, SRG-OS-000473-GPOS-00218
SV-217247r854141_rule SLES-12-020660 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all modifications to the lastlog file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217248r854142_rule SLES-12-020670 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the passmass command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217249r854143_rule SLES-12-020680 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the unix_chkpwd command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217250r854144_rule SLES-12-020690 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the chage command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217251r854145_rule SLES-12-020700 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the usermod command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217252r854146_rule SLES-12-020710 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the crontab command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217253r854147_rule SLES-12-020720 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the pam_timestamp_check command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217254r854148_rule SLES-12-020730 CCI-000169 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the delete_module command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217255r854150_rule SLES-12-020740 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all uses of the init_module and finit_module syscalls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall made by all programs on the system. Therefore, it is very important to use syscall rules only when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, however, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217257r854151_rule SLES-12-020760 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must generate audit records for all modifications to the faillog file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000392-GPOS-00172, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00215
SV-217258r877396_rule SLES-12-030000 CCI-000197 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not have the telnet-server package installed. It is detrimental for SUSE operating systems to provide, or install by default, functionality exceeding requirements or mission objectives. These unnecessary capabilities or services are often overlooked and therefore may remain unsecured. They increase the risk to the platform by providing additional attack vectors. SUSE operating systems are capable of providing a wide variety of functions and services. Some of the functions and services, provided by default, may not be necessary to support essential organizational operations (e.g., key missions and functions). Examples of nonessential capabilities include but are not limited to games, software packages, tools, and demonstration software not related to requirements or providing a wide array of functionality not required for every mission but which cannot be disabled. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000074-GPOS-00042, SRG-OS-000095-GPOS-00049
SV-217264r854154_rule SLES-12-030100 CCI-002418 HIGH All networked SUSE operating systems must have and implement SSH to protect the confidentiality and integrity of transmitted and received information, as well as information during preparation for transmission. Without protection of the transmitted information, confidentiality and integrity may be compromised because unprotected communications can be intercepted and either read or altered. This requirement applies to both internal and external networks and all types of information system components from which information can be transmitted (e.g., servers, mobile devices, notebook computers, printers, copiers, scanners, and facsimile machines). Communication paths outside the physical protection of a controlled boundary are exposed to the possibility of interception and modification. Protecting the confidentiality and integrity of organizational information can be accomplished by physical means (e.g., employing physical distribution systems) or by logical means (e.g., employing cryptographic techniques). If physical means of protection are employed, logical means (cryptography) do not have to be employed, and vice versa. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000423-GPOS-00187, SRG-OS-000424-GPOS-00188, SRG-OS-000425-GPOS-00189, SRG-OS-000426-GPOS-00190
SV-217265r603262_rule SLES-12-030110 CCI-000067 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must log SSH connection attempts and failures to the server. Remote access services, such as those providing remote access to network devices and information systems, which lack automated monitoring capabilities, increase risk and make remote user access management difficult at best. Remote access is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, nonorganization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Automated monitoring of remote access sessions allows organizations to detect cyber attacks and also ensure ongoing compliance with remote access policies by auditing connection activities of remote access capabilities, such as Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP), on a variety of information system components (e.g., servers, workstations, notebook computers, smartphones, and tablets).
SV-217266r858541_rule SLES-12-030130 CCI-000052 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must display the date and time of the last successful account logon upon an SSH logon. Providing users with feedback on when account accesses via SSH last occurred facilitates user recognition and reporting of unauthorized account use.
SV-217267r603262_rule SLES-12-030140 CCI-000770 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must deny direct logons to the root account using remote access via SSH. To assure individual accountability and prevent unauthorized access, organizational users must be individually identified and authenticated. A group authenticator is a generic account used by multiple individuals. Use of a group authenticator alone does not uniquely identify individual users. Examples of the group authenticator is the UNIX OS "root" user account, the Windows "Administrator" account, the "sa" account, or a "helpdesk" account. For example, the UNIX and Windows SUSE operating systems offer a "switch user" capability, allowing users to authenticate with their individual credentials and, when needed, "switch" to the administrator role. This method provides for unique individual authentication prior to using a group authenticator. Users (and any processes acting on behalf of users) need to be uniquely identified and authenticated for all accesses other than those accesses explicitly identified and documented by the organization, which outlines specific user actions that can be performed on the SUSE operating system without identification or authentication. Requiring individuals to be authenticated with an individual authenticator prior to using a group authenticator allows for traceability of actions, as well as adding an additional level of protection of the actions that can be taken with group account knowledge.
SV-217270r877398_rule SLES-12-030170 CCI-000803 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must implement DoD-approved encryption to protect the confidentiality of SSH remote connections. Without confidentiality protection mechanisms, unauthorized individuals may gain access to sensitive information via a remote access session. Remote access is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, nonorganization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Encryption provides a means to secure the remote connection to prevent unauthorized access to the data traversing the remote access connection (e.g., RDP), thereby providing a degree of confidentiality. The encryption strength of a mechanism is selected based on the security categorization of the information. The system will attempt to use the first cipher presented by the client that matches the server list. Listing the values "strongest to weakest" is a method to ensure the use of the strongest cipher available to secure the SSH connection. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000033-GPOS-00014, SRG-OS-000120-GPOS-00061, SRG-OS-000125-GPOS-00065, SRG-OS-000250-GPOS-00093, SRG-OS-000393-GPOS-00173
SV-217271r877395_rule SLES-12-030180 CCI-000877 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must be configured to only use Message Authentication Codes (MACs) employing FIPS 140-2 approved cryptographic hash algorithms. Without cryptographic integrity protections, information can be altered by unauthorized users without detection. Remote access (e.g., RDP) is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, nonorganization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Cryptographic mechanisms used for protecting the integrity of information include, for example, signed hash functions using asymmetric cryptography enabling distribution of the public key to verify the hash information while maintaining the confidentiality of the secret key used to generate the hash. The system will attempt to use the first hash presented by the client that matches the server list. Listing the values "strongest to weakest" is a method to ensure the use of the strongest hash available to secure the SSH connection. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000125-GPOS-00065, SRG-OS-000394-GPOS-00174
SV-217272r854157_rule SLES-12-030190 CCI-000879 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must be configured with a timeout interval. Terminating an idle session within a short time period reduces the window of opportunity for unauthorized personnel to take control of a management session enabled on the console or console port that has been left unattended. In addition, quickly terminating an idle session will also free up resources committed by the managed network element. Terminating network connections associated with communications sessions includes, for example, deallocating associated TCP/IP address/port pairs at the SUSE operating system level, and deallocating networking assignments at the application level if multiple application sessions are using a single SUSE operating system-level network connection. This does not mean that the SUSE operating system terminates all sessions or network access; it only ends the inactive session and releases the resources associated with that session. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000126-GPOS-00066, SRG-OS-000163-GPOS-00072, SRG-OS-000279-GPOS-00109
SV-217273r854158_rule SLES-12-030191 CCI-001133 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system for all network connections associated with SSH traffic must immediately terminate at the end of the session or after 10 minutes of inactivity. Automatic session termination addresses the termination of user-initiated logical sessions in contrast to the termination of network connections that are associated with communications sessions (i.e., network disconnect). A logical session (for local, network, and remote access) is initiated whenever a user (or process acting on behalf of a user) accesses an organizational information system. Such user sessions can be terminated (and thus terminate user access) without terminating network sessions. Session termination terminates all processes associated with a user's logical session except those processes that are specifically created by the user (i.e., session owner) to continue after the session is terminated. Conditions or trigger events requiring automatic session termination can include, for example, organization-defined periods of user inactivity, targeted responses to certain types of incidents, and time-of-day restrictions on information system use. This capability is typically reserved for specific SUSE operating system functionality where the system owner, data owner, or organization requires additional assurance.
SV-217274r603262_rule SLES-12-030200 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must be configured to not allow authentication using known hosts authentication. Configuring this setting for the SSH daemon provides additional assurance that remote logon via SSH will require a password, even in the event of misconfiguration elsewhere.
SV-217275r646750_rule SLES-12-030210 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon public host key files must have mode 0644 or less permissive. If a public host key file is modified by an unauthorized user, the SSH service may be compromised.
SV-217276r880919_rule SLES-12-030220 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon private host key files must have mode 0640 or less permissive. If an unauthorized user obtains the private SSH host key file, the host could be impersonated.
SV-217277r603262_rule SLES-12-030230 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must perform strict mode checking of home directory configuration files. If other users have access to modify user-specific SSH configuration files, they may be able to log on to the system as another user.
SV-217278r603262_rule SLES-12-030240 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must use privilege separation. SSH daemon privilege separation causes the SSH process to drop root privileges when not needed, which would decrease the impact of software vulnerabilities in the unprivileged section.
SV-217280r603964_rule SLES-12-030260 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system SSH daemon must disable forwarded remote X connections for interactive users, unless to fulfill documented and validated mission requirements. The security risk of using X11 forwarding is that the client's X11 display server may be exposed to attack when the SSH client requests forwarding. A system administrator may have a stance in which they want to protect clients that may expose themselves to attack by unwittingly requesting X11 forwarding, which can warrant a ''no'' setting. X11 forwarding should be enabled with caution. Users with the ability to bypass file permissions on the remote host (for the user's X11 authorization database) can access the local X11 display through the forwarded connection. An attacker may then be able to perform activities such as keystroke monitoring if the ForwardX11Trusted option is also enabled. If X11 services are not required for the system's intended function, they should be disabled or restricted as appropriate to the system’s needs.
SV-217283r854161_rule SLES-12-030320 CCI-002824 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must implement kptr-restrict to prevent the leaking of internal kernel addresses. Some adversaries launch attacks with the intent of executing code in nonexecutable regions of memory or in memory locations that are prohibited. Security safeguards employed to protect memory include, for example, data execution prevention and address space layout randomization. Data execution prevention safeguards can either be hardware-enforced or software-enforced, with hardware providing the greater strength of mechanism. Examples of attacks are buffer overflow attacks.
SV-217284r854162_rule SLES-12-030330 CCI-002824 MEDIUM Address space layout randomization (ASLR) must be implemented by the SUSE operating system to protect memory from unauthorized code execution. Some adversaries launch attacks with the intent of executing code in nonexecutable regions of memory or in memory locations that are prohibited. Security safeguards employed to protect memory include, for example, data execution prevention and address space layout randomization. Data execution prevention safeguards can either be hardware-enforced or software-enforced, with hardware providing the greater strength of mechanism. Examples of attacks are buffer overflow attacks.
SV-217286r603262_rule SLES-12-030350 CCI-001095 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must be configured to use TCP syncookies. Denial of Service (DoS) is a condition when a resource is not available for legitimate users. When this occurs, the organization either cannot accomplish its mission or must operate at degraded capacity. Managing excess capacity ensures that sufficient capacity is available to counter flooding attacks. Employing increased capacity and service redundancy may reduce the susceptibility to some DoS attacks. Managing excess capacity may include, for example, establishing selected usage priorities, quotas, or partitioning.
SV-217287r603262_rule SLES-12-030360 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not forward Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) source-routed packets. Source-routed packets allow the source of the packet to suggest that routers forward the packet along a different path than configured on the router, which can be used to bypass network security measures. This requirement applies only to the forwarding of source-routed traffic, such as when IPv4 forwarding is enabled and the system is functioning as a router.
SV-217288r603262_rule SLES-12-030361 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not forward Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) source-routed packets. Source-routed packets allow the source of the packet to suggest that routers forward the packet along a different path than configured on the router, which can be used to bypass network security measures. This requirement applies only to the forwarding of source-routed traffic, such as when IPv4 forwarding is enabled and the system is functioning as a router.
SV-217289r603262_rule SLES-12-030370 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not forward Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) source-routed packets by default. Source-routed packets allow the source of the packet to suggest that routers forward the packet along a different path than configured on the router, which can be used to bypass network security measures. This requirement applies only to the forwarding of source-routed traffic, such as when IPv4 forwarding is enabled and the system is functioning as a router.
SV-217290r603262_rule SLES-12-030380 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not respond to Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echoes sent to a broadcast address. Responding to broadcast (ICMP) echoes facilitates network mapping and provides a vector for amplification attacks.
SV-217291r603262_rule SLES-12-030390 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must prevent Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages from being accepted. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages modify the host's route table and are unauthenticated. An illicit ICMP redirect message could result in a man-in-the-middle attack.
SV-217292r603262_rule SLES-12-030400 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not allow interfaces to accept Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages by default. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages modify the host's route table and are unauthenticated. An illicit ICMP redirect message could result in a man-in-the-middle attack.
SV-217293r603262_rule SLES-12-030401 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not allow interfaces to accept Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages by default. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages modify the host's route table and are unauthenticated. An illicit ICMP redirect message could result in a man-in-the-middle attack.
SV-217294r603262_rule SLES-12-030410 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not allow interfaces to send Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages by default. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages contain information from the system's route table, possibly revealing portions of the network topology.
SV-217295r603262_rule SLES-12-030420 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not send Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirects. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages contain information from the system's route table, possibly revealing portions of the network topology.
SV-217296r646767_rule SLES-12-030430 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not be performing Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) packet forwarding unless the system is a router. Routing protocol daemons are typically used on routers to exchange network topology information with other routers. If this software is used when not required, system network information may be unnecessarily transmitted across the network.
SV-237603r646772_rule SLES-12-010111 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must restrict privilege elevation to authorized personnel. The sudo command allows a user to execute programs with elevated (administrator) privileges. It prompts the user for their password and confirms your request to execute a command by checking a file, called sudoers. If the "sudoers" file is not configured correctly, any user defined on the system can initiate privileged actions on the target system.
SV-237604r861101_rule SLES-12-010112 CCI-002227 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must use the invoking user's password for privilege escalation when using "sudo". The sudoers security policy requires that users authenticate themselves before they can use sudo. When sudoers requires authentication, it validates the invoking user's credentials. If the rootpw, targetpw, or runaspw flags are defined and not disabled, by default the operating system will prompt the invoking user for the "root" user password. For more information on each of the listed configurations, reference the sudoers(5) manual page.
SV-237605r861104_rule SLES-12-010113 CCI-002038 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must require re-authentication when using the "sudo" command. Without re-authentication, users may access resources or perform tasks for which they do not have authorization. When operating systems provide the capability to escalate a functional capability, it is critical the organization requires the user to re-authenticate when using the "sudo" command. If the value is set to an integer less than 0, the user's time stamp will not expire and the user will not have to re-authenticate for privileged actions until the user's session is terminated.
SV-237607r646784_rule SLES-12-010871 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library files must have mode 0755 or less permissive. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237608r646787_rule SLES-12-010872 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library directories must have mode 0755 or less permissive. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237609r646790_rule SLES-12-010873 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library files must be owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237610r646793_rule SLES-12-010874 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library directories must be owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237611r646796_rule SLES-12-010875 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library files must be group-owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237612r646799_rule SLES-12-010876 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system library directories must be group-owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237613r646802_rule SLES-12-010877 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have system commands set to a mode of 0755 or less permissive. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237614r646805_rule SLES-12-010878 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have directories that contain system commands set to a mode of 0755 or less permissive. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237615r646808_rule SLES-12-010879 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have system commands owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237616r646811_rule SLES-12-010881 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have directories that contain system commands owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237617r832997_rule SLES-12-010882 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have system commands group-owned by root or a system account. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237618r646817_rule SLES-12-010883 CCI-001499 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must have directories that contain system commands group-owned by root. If the SUSE operating system were to allow any user to make changes to software libraries, then those changes might be implemented without undergoing the appropriate testing and approvals that are part of a robust change management process. This requirement applies to SUSE operating systems with software libraries that are accessible and configurable, as in the case of interpreted languages. Software libraries also include privileged programs which execute with escalated privileges. Only qualified and authorized individuals must be allowed to obtain access to information system components for purposes of initiating changes, including upgrades and modifications.
SV-237619r877396_rule SLES-12-030011 CCI-000197 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not have the vsftpd package installed if not required for operational support. It is detrimental for SUSE operating systems to provide, or install by default, functionality exceeding requirements or mission objectives. These unnecessary capabilities or services are often overlooked, and therefore may remain unsecured. They increase the risk to the platform by providing additional attack vectors. SUSE operating systems are capable of providing a wide variety of functions and services. Some of the functions and services, provided by default, may not be necessary to support essential organizational operations (e.g., key missions and functions). Examples of nonessential capabilities include but are not limited to games, software packages, tools, and demonstration software not related to requirements or providing a wide array of functionality not required for every mission but which cannot be disabled.
SV-237620r646823_rule SLES-12-030362 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not forward Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) source-routed packets by default. Source-routed packets allow the source of the packet to suggest that routers forward the packet along a different path than configured on the router, which can be used to bypass network security measures. This requirement applies only to the forwarding of source-routed traffic, such as when IPv4 forwarding is enabled and the system is functioning as a router.
SV-237621r646826_rule SLES-12-030363 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must prevent Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) redirect messages from being accepted. ICMP redirect messages are used by routers to inform hosts that a more direct route exists for a particular destination. These messages modify the host's route table and are unauthenticated. An illicit ICMP redirect message could result in a man-in-the-middle attack.
SV-237622r646829_rule SLES-12-030364 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not be performing Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) packet forwarding unless the system is a router. Routing protocol daemons are typically used on routers to exchange network topology information with other routers. If this software is used when not required, system network information may be unnecessarily transmitted across the network.
SV-237623r646832_rule SLES-12-030365 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The SUSE operating system must not be performing Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) packet forwarding by default unless the system is a router. Routing protocol daemons are typically used on routers to exchange network topology information with other routers. If this software is used when not required, system network information may be unnecessarily transmitted across the network.