Canonical Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Security Technical Implementation Guide
V001.001R1 2021-11-19       U_CAN_Ubuntu_20-04_LTS_V1R1_STIG_SCAP_1-2_Benchmark.xml
This Security Technical Implementation Guide is published as a tool to improve the security of Department of Defense (DoD) information systems. The requirements are derived from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 800-53 and related documents. Comments or proposed revisions to this document should be sent via email to the following address: [email protected]
Vuln Rule Version CCI Severity Title Description
SV-238200r653775_rule UBTU-20-010005 CCI-000058 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must allow users to directly initiate a session lock for all connection types. A session lock is a temporary action taken when a user stops work and moves away from the immediate physical vicinity of the information system but does not want to log out because of the temporary nature of the absence. The session lock is implemented at the point where session activity can be determined. Rather than be forced to wait for a period of time to expire before the user session can be locked, the Ubuntu operating systems need to provide users with the ability to manually invoke a session lock so users may secure their session if they need to temporarily vacate the immediate physical vicinity. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000030-GPOS-00011, SRG-OS-000031-GPOS-00012
SV-238201r653778_rule UBTU-20-010006 CCI-000187 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must map the authenticated identity to the user or group account for PKI-based authentication. Without mapping the certificate used to authenticate to the user account, the ability to determine the identity of the individual user or group will not be available for forensic analysis.
SV-238202r653781_rule UBTU-20-010007 CCI-000198 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce 24 hours/1 day as the minimum password lifetime. Passwords for new users must have a 24 hours/1 day minimum password lifetime restriction. Enforcing a minimum password lifetime helps to prevent repeated password changes to defeat the password reuse or history enforcement requirement. If users are allowed to immediately and continually change their password, then the password could be repeatedly changed in a short period of time to defeat the organization's policy regarding password reuse.
SV-238203r653784_rule UBTU-20-010008 CCI-000199 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce a 60-day maximum password lifetime restriction. Passwords for new users must have a 60-day maximum password lifetime restriction. Any password, no matter how complex, can eventually be cracked. Therefore, passwords need to be changed periodically. If the operating system does not limit the lifetime of passwords and force users to change their passwords, there is the risk that the operating system passwords could be compromised.
SV-238204r653787_rule UBTU-20-010009 CCI-000213 HIGH Ubuntu operating systems when booted must require authentication upon booting into single-user and maintenance modes. To mitigate the risk of unauthorized access to sensitive information by entities that have been issued certificates by DoD-approved PKIs, all DoD systems (e.g., web servers and web portals) must be properly configured to incorporate access control methods that do not rely solely on the possession of a certificate for access. Successful authentication must not automatically give an entity access to an asset or security boundary. Authorization procedures and controls must be implemented to ensure each authenticated entity also has a validated and current authorization. Authorization is the process of determining whether an entity, once authenticated, is permitted to access a specific asset. Information systems use access control policies and enforcement mechanisms to implement this requirement. Access control policies include identity-based policies, role-based policies, and attribute-based policies. Access enforcement mechanisms include access control lists, access control matrices, and cryptography. These policies and mechanisms must be employed by the application to control access between users (or processes acting on behalf of users) and objects (e.g., devices, files, records, processes, programs, and domains) in the information system.
SV-238208r653799_rule UBTU-20-010014 CCI-002038 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must require users to reauthenticate for privilege escalation or when changing roles. Without reauthentication, users may access resources or perform tasks for which they do not have authorization. When operating systems provide the capability to escalate a functional capability, it is critical the user reauthenticate. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00156, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00157
SV-238209r653802_rule UBTU-20-010016 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system default filesystem permissions must be defined in such a way that all authenticated users can read and modify only their own files. Setting the most restrictive default permissions ensures that when new accounts are created they do not have unnecessary access.
SV-238210r653805_rule UBTU-20-010033 CCI-000765 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must implement smart card logins for multifactor authentication for local and network access to privileged and non-privileged accounts. Without the use of multifactor authentication, the ease of access to privileged functions is greatly increased. Multifactor authentication requires using two or more factors to achieve authentication. Factors include: 1) something a user knows (e.g., password/PIN); 2) something a user has (e.g., cryptographic identification device, token); and 3) something a user is (e.g., biometric). A privileged account is defined as an information system account with authorizations of a privileged user. Network access is defined as access to an information system by a user (or a process acting on behalf of a user) communicating through a network (e.g., local area network, wide area network, or the internet). The DoD CAC with DoD-approved PKI is an example of multifactor authentication. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000105-GPOS-00052, SRG-OS-000106-GPOS-00053, SRG-OS-000107-GPOS-00054, SRG-OS-000108-GPOS-00055
SV-238211r653808_rule UBTU-20-010035 CCI-000877 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must use strong authenticators in establishing nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic sessions. Nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities conducted by individuals communicating through a network, either an external network (e.g., the internet) or an internal network. Local maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities carried out by individuals physically present at the information system or information system component and not communicating across a network connection. Typically, strong authentication requires authenticators that are resistant to replay attacks and employ multifactor authentication. Strong authenticators include, for example, PKI where certificates are stored on a token protected by a password, passphrase, or biometric.
SV-238212r653811_rule UBTU-20-010036 CCI-000879 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must immediately terminate all network connections associated with SSH traffic after a period of inactivity. Automatic session termination addresses the termination of user-initiated logical sessions in contrast to the termination of network connections that are associated with communications sessions (i.e., network disconnect). A logical session (for local, network, and remote access) is initiated whenever a user (or process acting on behalf of a user) accesses an organizational information system. Such user sessions can be terminated (and thus terminate user access) without terminating network sessions. Session termination terminates all processes associated with a user's logical session except those processes that are specifically created by the user (i.e., session owner) to continue after the session is terminated. Conditions or trigger events requiring automatic session termination can include, for example, organization-defined periods of user inactivity, targeted responses to certain types of incidents, and time-of-day restrictions on information system use. This capability is typically reserved for specific Ubuntu operating system functionality where the system owner, data owner, or organization requires additional assurance.
SV-238213r653814_rule UBTU-20-010037 CCI-001133 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must immediately terminate all network connections associated with SSH traffic at the end of the session or after 10 minutes of inactivity. Terminating an idle session within a short time period reduces the window of opportunity for unauthorized personnel to take control of a management session enabled on the console or console port that has been left unattended. In addition, quickly terminating an idle session will also free up resources committed by the managed network element. Terminating network connections associated with communications sessions includes, for example, de-allocating associated TCP/IP address/port pairs at the operating system level, and de-allocating networking assignments at the application level if multiple application sessions are using a single operating system-level network connection. This does not mean that the operating system terminates all sessions or network access; it only ends the inactive session and releases the resources associated with that session.
SV-238216r654316_rule UBTU-20-010043 CCI-001453 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the SSH daemon to use Message Authentication Codes (MACs) employing FIPS 140-2 approved cryptographic hashes to prevent the unauthorized disclosure of information and/or detect changes to information during transmission. Without cryptographic integrity protections, information can be altered by unauthorized users without detection. Remote access (e.g., RDP) is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, non-organization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities conducted by individuals communicating through a network, either an external network (e.g., the internet) or an internal network. Local maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities carried out by individuals physically present at the information system or information system component and not communicating across a network connection. Encrypting information for transmission protects information from unauthorized disclosure and modification. Cryptographic mechanisms implemented to protect information integrity include, for example, cryptographic hash functions which have common application in digital signatures, checksums, and message authentication codes. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000424-GPOS-00188, SRG-OS-000250-GPOS-00093, SRG-OS-000393-GPOS-00173
SV-238217r653826_rule UBTU-20-010044 CCI-000068 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the SSH daemon to use FIPS 140-2 approved ciphers to prevent the unauthorized disclosure of information and/or detect changes to information during transmission. Without cryptographic integrity protections, information can be altered by unauthorized users without detection. Remote access (e.g., RDP) is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, non-organization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Nonlocal maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities conducted by individuals communicating through a network, either an external network (e.g., the internet) or an internal network. Local maintenance and diagnostic activities are those activities carried out by individuals physically present at the information system or information system component and not communicating across a network connection. Encrypting information for transmission protects information from unauthorized disclosure and modification. Cryptographic mechanisms implemented to protect information integrity include, for example, cryptographic hash functions which have common application in digital signatures, checksums, and message authentication codes. By specifying a cipher list with the order of ciphers being in a "strongest to weakest" orientation, the system will automatically attempt to use the strongest cipher for securing SSH connections. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000424-GPOS-00188, SRG-OS-000033-GPOS-00014, SRG-OS-000394-GPOS-00174
SV-238218r653829_rule UBTU-20-010047 CCI-000366 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must not allow unattended or automatic login via SSH. Failure to restrict system access to authenticated users negatively impacts Ubuntu operating system security.
SV-238219r653832_rule UBTU-20-010048 CCI-000366 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must be configured so that remote X connections are disabled, unless to fulfill documented and validated mission requirements. The security risk of using X11 forwarding is that the client's X11 display server may be exposed to attack when the SSH client requests forwarding. A System Administrator may have a stance in which they want to protect clients that may expose themselves to attack by unwittingly requesting X11 forwarding, which can warrant a ''no'' setting. X11 forwarding should be enabled with caution. Users with the ability to bypass file permissions on the remote host (for the user's X11 authorization database) can access the local X11 display through the forwarded connection. An attacker may then be able to perform activities such as keystroke monitoring if the ForwardX11Trusted option is also enabled. If X11 services are not required for the system's intended function, they should be disabled or restricted as appropriate to the system’s needs.
SV-238220r653835_rule UBTU-20-010049 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system SSH daemon must prevent remote hosts from connecting to the proxy display. When X11 forwarding is enabled, there may be additional exposure to the server and client displays if the sshd proxy display is configured to listen on the wildcard address. By default, sshd binds the forwarding server to the loopback address and sets the hostname part of the DISPLAY environment variable to localhost. This prevents remote hosts from connecting to the proxy display.
SV-238221r653838_rule UBTU-20-010050 CCI-000192 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one upper-case character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determines how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
SV-238222r653841_rule UBTU-20-010051 CCI-000193 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one lower-case character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determines how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
SV-238223r653844_rule UBTU-20-010052 CCI-000194 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one numeric character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor of several that determines how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised.
SV-238224r653847_rule UBTU-20-010053 CCI-000195 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must require the change of at least 8 characters when passwords are changed. If the operating system allows the user to consecutively reuse extensive portions of passwords, this increases the chances of password compromise by increasing the window of opportunity for attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. The number of changed characters refers to the number of changes required with respect to the total number of positions in the current password. In other words, characters may be the same within the two passwords; however, the positions of the like characters must be different. If the password length is an odd number then number of changed characters must be rounded up. For example, a password length of 15 characters must require the change of at least 8 characters.
SV-238225r653850_rule UBTU-20-010054 CCI-000205 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must enforce a minimum 15-character password length. The shorter the password, the lower the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password length is one factor of several that helps to determine strength and how long it takes to crack a password. Use of more characters in a password helps to exponentially increase the time and/or resources required to compromise the password.
SV-238226r653853_rule UBTU-20-010055 CCI-001619 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce password complexity by requiring that at least one special character be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity or strength is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. Password complexity is one factor in determining how long it takes to crack a password. The more complex the password, the greater the number of possible combinations that need to be tested before the password is compromised. Special characters are those characters that are not alphanumeric. Examples include: ~ ! @ # $ % ^ *.
SV-238227r653856_rule UBTU-20-010056 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must prevent the use of dictionary words for passwords. If the Ubuntu operating system allows the user to select passwords based on dictionary words, then this increases the chances of password compromise by increasing the opportunity for successful guesses and brute-force attacks.
SV-238228r653859_rule UBTU-20-010057 CCI-000366 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must be configured so that when passwords are changed or new passwords are established, pwquality must be used. Use of a complex password helps to increase the time and resources required to compromise the password. Password complexity, or strength, is a measure of the effectiveness of a password in resisting attempts at guessing and brute-force attacks. "pwquality" enforces complex password construction configuration and has the ability to limit brute-force attacks on the system.
SV-238229r653862_rule UBTU-20-010060 CCI-000185 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system, for PKI-based authentication, must validate certificates by constructing a certification path (which includes status information) to an accepted trust anchor. Without path validation, an informed trust decision by the relying party cannot be made when presented with any certificate not already explicitly trusted. A trust anchor is an authoritative entity represented via a public key and associated data. It is used in the context of public key infrastructures, X.509 digital certificates, and DNSSEC. When there is a chain of trust, usually the top entity to be trusted becomes the trust anchor; it can be, for example, a Certification Authority (CA). A certification path starts with the subject certificate and proceeds through a number of intermediate certificates up to a trusted root certificate, typically issued by a trusted CA. This requirement verifies that a certification path to an accepted trust anchor is used for certificate validation and that the path includes status information. Path validation is necessary for a relying party to make an informed trust decision when presented with any certificate not already explicitly trusted. Status information for certification paths includes certificate revocation lists or online certificate status protocol responses. Validation of the certificate status information is out of scope for this requirement.
SV-238230r653865_rule UBTU-20-010063 CCI-001948 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must implement multifactor authentication for remote access to privileged accounts in such a way that one of the factors is provided by a device separate from the system gaining access. Using an authentication device, such as a CAC or token that is separate from the information system, ensures that even if the information system is compromised, that compromise will not affect credentials stored on the authentication device. Multifactor solutions that require devices separate from information systems gaining access include, for example, hardware tokens providing time-based or challenge-response authenticators and smart cards such as the U.S. Government Personal Identity Verification card and the DoD Common Access Card. A privileged account is defined as an information system account with authorizations of a privileged user. Remote access is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, non-organization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. This requirement only applies to components where this is specific to the function of the device or has the concept of an organizational user (e.g., VPN, proxy capability). This does not apply to authentication for the purpose of configuring the device itself (management).
SV-238231r653868_rule UBTU-20-010064 CCI-001953 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must accept Personal Identity Verification (PIV) credentials. The use of PIV credentials facilitates standardization and reduces the risk of unauthorized access. DoD has mandated the use of the CAC to support identity management and personal authentication for systems covered under Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) 12, as well as making the CAC a primary component of layered protection for national security systems.
SV-238232r653871_rule UBTU-20-010065 CCI-001954 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must electronically verify Personal Identity Verification (PIV) credentials. The use of PIV credentials facilitates standardization and reduces the risk of unauthorized access. DoD has mandated the use of the CAC to support identity management and personal authentication for systems covered under Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) 12, as well as making the CAC a primary component of layered protection for national security systems.
SV-238233r653874_rule UBTU-20-010066 CCI-001991 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system for PKI-based authentication, must implement a local cache of revocation data in case of the inability to access revocation information via the network. Without configuring a local cache of revocation data, there is the potential to allow access to users who are no longer authorized (users with revoked certificates).
SV-238235r802383_rule UBTU-20-010072 CCI-000044 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must automatically lock an account until the locked account is released by an administrator when three unsuccessful logon attempts have been made. By limiting the number of failed logon attempts, the risk of unauthorized system access via user password guessing, otherwise known as brute-forcing, is reduced. Limits are imposed by locking the account. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000329-GPOS-00128, SRG-OS-000021-GPOS-00005
SV-238237r653886_rule UBTU-20-010075 CCI-000366 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must enforce a delay of at least 4 seconds between logon prompts following a failed logon attempt. Limiting the number of logon attempts over a certain time interval reduces the chances that an unauthorized user may gain access to an account.
SV-238238r653889_rule UBTU-20-010100 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/passwd. Once an attacker establishes access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create an account. Auditing account creation actions provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. To address access requirements, many operating systems may be integrated with enterprise level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000458-GPOS-00203, SRG-OS-000463-GPOS-00207, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-238239r653892_rule UBTU-20-010101 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/group. Once an attacker establishes access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create an account. Auditing account creation actions provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. To address access requirements, many operating systems may be integrated with enterprise level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000458-GPOS-00203, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-238240r653895_rule UBTU-20-010102 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/shadow. Once an attacker establishes access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create an account. Auditing account creation actions provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. To address access requirements, many operating systems may be integrated with enterprise level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000458-GPOS-00203, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-238241r653898_rule UBTU-20-010103 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/gshadow. Once an attacker establishes access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create an account. Auditing account creation actions provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. To address access requirements, many operating systems may be integrated with enterprise level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000458-GPOS-00203, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-238242r653901_rule UBTU-20-010104 CCI-000018 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for all account creations, modifications, disabling, and termination events that affect /etc/opasswd. Once an attacker establishes access to a system, the attacker often attempts to create a persistent method of reestablishing access. One way to accomplish this is for the attacker to create an account. Auditing account creation actions provides logging that can be used for forensic purposes. To address access requirements, many operating systems may be integrated with enterprise level authentication/access/auditing mechanisms that meet or exceed access control policy requirements. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000004-GPOS-00004, SRG-OS-000239-GPOS-00089, SRG-OS-000240-GPOS-00090, SRG-OS-000241-GPOS-00091, SRG-OS-000303-GPOS-00120, SRG-OS-000458-GPOS-00203, SRG-OS-000476-GPOS-00221
SV-238244r653907_rule UBTU-20-010118 CCI-000140 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must shut down by default upon audit failure (unless availability is an overriding concern). It is critical that when the operating system is at risk of failing to process audit logs as required, it takes action to mitigate the failure. Audit processing failures include: software/hardware errors; failures in the audit capturing mechanisms; and audit storage capacity being reached or exceeded. Responses to audit failure depend upon the nature of the failure mode. When availability is an overriding concern, other approved actions in response to an audit failure are as follows: 1) If the failure was caused by the lack of audit record storage capacity, the operating system must continue generating audit records if possible (automatically restarting the audit service if necessary), overwriting the oldest audit records in a first-in-first-out manner. 2) If audit records are sent to a centralized collection server and communication with this server is lost or the server fails, the operating system must queue audit records locally until communication is restored or until the audit records are retrieved manually. Upon restoration of the connection to the centralized collection server, action should be taken to synchronize the local audit data with the collection server.
SV-238249r653922_rule UBTU-20-010133 CCI-000171 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must be configured so that audit configuration files are not write-accessible by unauthorized users. Without the capability to restrict which roles and individuals can select which events are audited, unauthorized personnel may be able to prevent the auditing of critical events. Misconfigured audits may degrade the system's performance by overwhelming the audit log. Misconfigured audits may also make it more difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one.
SV-238250r653925_rule UBTU-20-010134 CCI-000171 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must permit only authorized accounts to own the audit configuration files. Without the capability to restrict which roles and individuals can select which events are audited, unauthorized personnel may be able to prevent the auditing of critical events. Misconfigured audits may degrade the system's performance by overwhelming the audit log. Misconfigured audits may also make it more difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one.
SV-238251r653928_rule UBTU-20-010135 CCI-000171 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must permit only authorized groups to own the audit configuration files. Without the capability to restrict which roles and individuals can select which events are audited, unauthorized personnel may be able to prevent the auditing of critical events. Misconfigured audits may degrade the system's performance by overwhelming the audit log. Misconfigured audits may also make it more difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one.
SV-238252r653931_rule UBTU-20-010136 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the su command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238253r653934_rule UBTU-20-010137 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chfn command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238254r653937_rule UBTU-20-010138 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the mount command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238255r653940_rule UBTU-20-010139 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the umount command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238256r653943_rule UBTU-20-010140 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the ssh-agent command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238257r653946_rule UBTU-20-010141 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the ssh-keysign command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238258r808474_rule UBTU-20-010142 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for any use of the setxattr, fsetxattr, lsetxattr, removexattr, fremovexattr, and lremovexattr system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206
SV-238264r808477_rule UBTU-20-010148 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chown, fchown, fchownat, and lchown system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206
SV-238268r808480_rule UBTU-20-010152 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chmod, fchmod, and fchmodat system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000462-GPOS-00206
SV-238271r808483_rule UBTU-20-010155 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the creat, open, openat, open_by_handle_at, truncate, and ftruncate system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000474-GPOS-00219
SV-238277r654006_rule UBTU-20-010161 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the sudo command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238278r654009_rule UBTU-20-010162 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the sudoedit command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238279r654012_rule UBTU-20-010163 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chsh command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238280r654015_rule UBTU-20-010164 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the newgrp command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238281r654018_rule UBTU-20-010165 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chcon command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238282r654021_rule UBTU-20-010166 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the apparmor_parser command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238283r654024_rule UBTU-20-010167 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the setfacl command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238284r654027_rule UBTU-20-010168 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chacl command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238285r654030_rule UBTU-20-010169 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the use and modification of the tallylog file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000470-GPOS-00214, SRG-OS-000473-GPOS-00218
SV-238286r654033_rule UBTU-20-010170 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the use and modification of faillog file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000470-GPOS-00214, SRG-OS-000473-GPOS-00218
SV-238287r654036_rule UBTU-20-010171 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the use and modification of the lastlog file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000470-GPOS-00214, SRG-OS-000473-GPOS-00218
SV-238288r654039_rule UBTU-20-010172 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the passwd command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238289r654042_rule UBTU-20-010173 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the unix_update command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238290r654045_rule UBTU-20-010174 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the gpasswd command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238291r654048_rule UBTU-20-010175 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the chage command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238292r654051_rule UBTU-20-010176 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the usermod command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238293r654054_rule UBTU-20-010177 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the crontab command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238294r654057_rule UBTU-20-010178 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the pam_timestamp_check command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238295r808486_rule UBTU-20-010179 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the init_module and finit_module syscalls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000064-GPOS-00033, SRG-OS-000471-GPOS-00216
SV-238297r802387_rule UBTU-20-010181 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for successful/unsuccessful uses of the delete_module syscall. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). Satisfies: SRG-OS-000477-GPOS-00222
SV-238298r654069_rule UBTU-20-010182 CCI-000130 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must produce audit records and reports containing information to establish when, where, what type, the source, and the outcome for all DoD-defined auditable events and actions in near real time. Without establishing the when, where, type, source, and outcome of events that occurred, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events leading up to an outage or attack. Without the capability to generate audit records, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit record content that may be necessary to satisfy this requirement includes, for example, time stamps, source and destination addresses, user/process identifiers, event descriptions, success/fail indications, filenames involved, and access control or flow control rules invoked. Reconstruction of harmful events or forensic analysis is not possible if audit records do not contain enough information. Successful incident response and auditing relies on timely, accurate system information and analysis in order to allow the organization to identify and respond to potential incidents in a proficient manner. If the operating system does not provide the ability to centrally review the operating system logs, forensic analysis is negatively impacted. Associating event types with detected events in the Ubuntu operating system audit logs provides a means of investigating an attack; recognizing resource utilization or capacity thresholds; or identifying an improperly configured operating system. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000122-GPOS-00063, SRG-OS-000037-GPOS-00015, SRG-OS-000038-GPOS-00016, SRG-OS-000039-GPOS-00017, SRG-OS-000040-GPOS-00018, SRG-OS-000041-GPOS-00019, SRG-OS-000042-GPOS-00020, SRG-OS-000042-GPOS-00021, SRG-OS-000051-GPOS-00024, SRG-OS-000054-GPOS-00025, SRG-OS-000062-GPOS-00031, SRG-OS-000337-GPOS-00129, SRG-OS-000348-GPOS-00136, SRG-OS-000349-GPOS-00137, SRG-OS-000350-GPOS-00138, SRG-OS-000351-GPOS-00139, SRG-OS-000352-GPOS-00140, SRG-OS-000353-GPOS-00141, SRG-OS-000354-GPOS-00142, SRG-OS-000475-GPOS-00220
SV-238299r654072_rule UBTU-20-010198 CCI-001464 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must initiate session audits at system start-up. If auditing is enabled late in the start-up process, the actions of some start-up processes may not be audited. Some audit systems also maintain state information only available if auditing is enabled before a given process is created.
SV-238300r654075_rule UBTU-20-010199 CCI-001493 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure audit tools with a mode of 0755 or less permissive. Protecting audit information also includes identifying and protecting the tools used to view and manipulate log data. Therefore, protecting audit tools is necessary to prevent unauthorized operation on audit information. Operating systems providing tools to interface with audit information will leverage user permissions and roles identifying the user accessing the tools and the corresponding rights the user enjoys in order to make access decisions regarding the access to audit tools. Audit tools include, but are not limited to, vendor-provided and open source audit tools needed to successfully view and manipulate audit information system activity and records. Audit tools include custom queries and report generators. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000256-GPOS-00097, SRG-OS-000257-GPOS-00098
SV-238301r654078_rule UBTU-20-010200 CCI-001493 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure audit tools to be owned by root. Protecting audit information also includes identifying and protecting the tools used to view and manipulate log data. Therefore, protecting audit tools is necessary to prevent unauthorized operation on audit information. Operating systems providing tools to interface with audit information will leverage user permissions and roles identifying the user accessing the tools and the corresponding rights the user enjoys in order to make access decisions regarding the access to audit tools. Audit tools include, but are not limited to, vendor-provided and open source audit tools needed to successfully view and manipulate audit information system activity and records. Audit tools include custom queries and report generators. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000256-GPOS-00097, SRG-OS-000257-GPOS-00098
SV-238302r654081_rule UBTU-20-010201 CCI-001493 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the audit tools to be group-owned by root. Protecting audit information also includes identifying and protecting the tools used to view and manipulate log data. Therefore, protecting audit tools is necessary to prevent unauthorized operation on audit information. Operating systems providing tools to interface with audit information will leverage user permissions and roles identifying the user accessing the tools and the corresponding rights the user enjoys in order to make access decisions regarding the access to audit tools. Audit tools include, but are not limited to, vendor-provided and open source audit tools needed to successfully view and manipulate audit information system activity and records. Audit tools include custom queries and report generators. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000256-GPOS-00097, SRG-OS-000257-GPOS-00098
SV-238304r654087_rule UBTU-20-010211 CCI-002233 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must prevent all software from executing at higher privilege levels than users executing the software and the audit system must be configured to audit the execution of privileged functions. In certain situations, software applications/programs need to execute with elevated privileges to perform required functions. However, if the privileges required for execution are at a higher level than the privileges assigned to organizational users invoking such applications/programs, those users are indirectly provided with greater privileges than assigned by the organizations. Some programs and processes are required to operate at a higher privilege level and therefore should be excluded from the organization-defined software list after review. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000326-GPOS-00126, SRG-OS-000327-GPOS-00127
SV-238310r808489_rule UBTU-20-010267 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for any successful/unsuccessful use of unlink, unlinkat, rename, renameat, and rmdir system calls. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter). The system call rules are loaded into a matching engine that intercepts each syscall that all programs on the system makes. Therefore, it is very important to only use syscall rules when absolutely necessary since these affect performance. The more rules, the bigger the performance hit. The performance is helped, though, by combining syscalls into one rule whenever possible.
SV-238315r654120_rule UBTU-20-010277 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the /var/log/wtmp file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238316r654123_rule UBTU-20-010278 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the /var/run/wtmp file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238317r654126_rule UBTU-20-010279 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records for the /var/log/btmp file. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238318r654129_rule UBTU-20-010296 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful attempts to use modprobe command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238319r654132_rule UBTU-20-010297 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful attempts to use the kmod command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238320r654135_rule UBTU-20-010298 CCI-000172 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate audit records when successful/unsuccessful attempts to use the fdisk command. Without generating audit records that are specific to the security and mission needs of the organization, it would be difficult to establish, correlate, and investigate the events relating to an incident or identify those responsible for one. Audit records can be generated from various components within the information system (e.g., module or policy filter).
SV-238323r654144_rule UBTU-20-010400 CCI-000054 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must limit the number of concurrent sessions to ten for all accounts and/or account types. The Ubuntu operating system management includes the ability to control the number of users and user sessions that utilize an operating system. Limiting the number of allowed users and sessions per user is helpful in reducing the risks related to DoS attacks. This requirement addresses concurrent sessions for information system accounts and does not address concurrent sessions by single users via multiple system accounts. The maximum number of concurrent sessions should be defined based upon mission needs and the operational environment for each system.
SV-238325r654150_rule UBTU-20-010404 CCI-000803 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must encrypt all stored passwords with a FIPS 140-2 approved cryptographic hashing algorithm. Passwords need to be protected at all times, and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised.
SV-238326r654153_rule UBTU-20-010405 CCI-000197 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must not have the telnet package installed. Passwords need to be protected at all times, and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised.
SV-238327r654156_rule UBTU-20-010406 CCI-000381 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must not have the rsh-server package installed. It is detrimental for operating systems to provide, or install by default, functionality exceeding requirements or mission objectives. These unnecessary capabilities or services are often overlooked and therefore may remain unsecured. They increase the risk to the platform by providing additional attack vectors. Operating systems are capable of providing a wide variety of functions and services. Some of the functions and services, provided by default, may not be necessary to support essential organizational operations (e.g., key missions, functions). Examples of non-essential capabilities include, but are not limited to, games, software packages, tools, and demonstration software, not related to requirements or providing a wide array of functionality not required for every mission, but which cannot be disabled.
SV-238330r654165_rule UBTU-20-010409 CCI-000795 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must disable account identifiers (individuals, groups, roles, and devices) after 35 days of inactivity. Inactive identifiers pose a risk to systems and applications because attackers may exploit an inactive identifier and potentially obtain undetected access to the system. Owners of inactive accounts will not notice if unauthorized access to their user account has been obtained. Operating systems need to track periods of inactivity and disable application identifiers after 35 days of inactivity.
SV-238333r654174_rule UBTU-20-010412 CCI-001095 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must be configured to use TCP syncookies. DoS is a condition when a resource is not available for legitimate users. When this occurs, the organization either cannot accomplish its mission or must operate at degraded capacity. Managing excess capacity ensures that sufficient capacity is available to counter flooding attacks. Employing increased capacity and service redundancy may reduce the susceptibility to some DoS attacks. Managing excess capacity may include, for example, establishing selected usage priorities, quotas, or partitioning.
SV-238337r654186_rule UBTU-20-010416 CCI-001312 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must generate error messages that provide information necessary for corrective actions without revealing information that could be exploited by adversaries. Any operating system providing too much information in error messages risks compromising the data and security of the structure, and content of error messages needs to be carefully considered by the organization. Organizations carefully consider the structure/content of error messages. The extent to which information systems are able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements. Information that could be exploited by adversaries includes, for example, erroneous logon attempts with passwords entered by mistake as the username, mission/business information that can be derived from (if not stated explicitly by) information recorded, and personal information, such as account numbers, social security numbers, and credit card numbers.
SV-238338r654189_rule UBTU-20-010417 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the /var/log directory to be group-owned by syslog. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238339r654192_rule UBTU-20-010418 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the /var/log directory to be owned by root. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238340r654195_rule UBTU-20-010419 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the /var/log directory to have mode 0750 or less permissive. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238341r654198_rule UBTU-20-010420 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure the /var/log/syslog file to be group-owned by adm. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238342r654201_rule UBTU-20-010421 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure /var/log/syslog file to be owned by syslog. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238343r654204_rule UBTU-20-010422 CCI-001314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must configure /var/log/syslog file with mode 0640 or less permissive. Only authorized personnel should be aware of errors and the details of the errors. Error messages are an indicator of an organization's operational state or can identify the operating system or platform. Additionally, Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and operational information must not be revealed through error messages to unauthorized personnel or their designated representatives. The structure and content of error messages must be carefully considered by the organization and development team. The extent to which the information system is able to identify and handle error conditions is guided by organizational policy and operational requirements.
SV-238354r654237_rule UBTU-20-010433 CCI-002314 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must have an application firewall installed in order to control remote access methods. Remote access services, such as those providing remote access to network devices and information systems, which lack automated control capabilities, increase risk and make remote user access management difficult at best. Remote access is access to DoD nonpublic information systems by an authorized user (or an information system) communicating through an external, non-organization-controlled network. Remote access methods include, for example, dial-up, broadband, and wireless. Ubuntu operating system functionality (e.g., RDP) must be capable of taking enforcement action if the audit reveals unauthorized activity. Automated control of remote access sessions allows organizations to ensure ongoing compliance with remote access policies by enforcing connection rules of remote access applications on a variety of information system components (e.g., servers, workstations, notebook computers, smartphones, and tablets).
SV-238357r654246_rule UBTU-20-010436 CCI-002046 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must synchronize internal information system clocks to the authoritative time source when the time difference is greater than one second. Inaccurate time stamps make it more difficult to correlate events and can lead to an inaccurate analysis. Determining the correct time a particular event occurred on a system is critical when conducting forensic analysis and investigating system events. Synchronizing internal information system clocks provides uniformity of time stamps for information systems with multiple system clocks and systems connected over a network. Organizations should consider setting time periods for different types of systems (e.g., financial, legal, or mission-critical systems). Organizations should also consider endpoints that may not have regular access to the authoritative time server (e.g., mobile, teleworking, and tactical endpoints). This requirement is related to the comparison done every 24 hours in SRG-OS-000355 because a comparison must be done in order to determine the time difference.
SV-238359r654319_rule UBTU-20-010438 CCI-001749 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system's Advance Package Tool (APT) must be configured to prevent the installation of patches, service packs, device drivers, or Ubuntu operating system components without verification they have been digitally signed using a certificate that is recognized and approved by the organization. Changes to any software components can have significant effects on the overall security of the operating system. This requirement ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor. Accordingly, patches, service packs, device drivers, or operating system components must be signed with a certificate recognized and approved by the organization. Verifying the authenticity of the software prior to installation validates the integrity of the patch or upgrade received from a vendor. This ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor. Self-signed certificates are disallowed by this requirement. The operating system should not have to verify the software again. This requirement does not mandate DoD certificates for this purpose; however, the certificate used to verify the software must be from an approved CA.
SV-238363r654320_rule UBTU-20-010442 CCI-002450 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must implement NIST FIPS-validated cryptography to protect classified information and for the following: to provision digital signatures, to generate cryptographic hashes, and to protect unclassified information requiring confidentiality and cryptographic protection in accordance with applicable federal laws, Executive Orders, directives, policies, regulations, and standards. Use of weak or untested encryption algorithms undermines the purposes of utilizing encryption to protect data. The operating system must implement cryptographic modules adhering to the higher standards approved by the federal government since this provides assurance they have been tested and validated. Satisfies: SRG-OS-000396-GPOS-00176, SRG-OS-000478-GPOS-00223
SV-238369r654282_rule UBTU-20-010448 CCI-002824 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must implement address space layout randomization to protect its memory from unauthorized code execution. Some adversaries launch attacks with the intent of executing code in non-executable regions of memory or in memory locations that are prohibited. Security safeguards employed to protect memory include, for example, data execution prevention and address space layout randomization. Data execution prevention safeguards can either be hardware-enforced or software-enforced with hardware providing the greater strength of mechanism. Examples of attacks are buffer overflow attacks.
SV-238370r654285_rule UBTU-20-010449 CCI-002617 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must be configured so that Advance Package Tool (APT) removes all software components after updated versions have been installed. Previous versions of software components that are not removed from the information system after updates have been installed may be exploited by adversaries. Some information technology products may remove older versions of software automatically from the information system.
SV-238371r654288_rule UBTU-20-010450 CCI-002696 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must use a file integrity tool to verify correct operation of all security functions. Without verification of the security functions, security functions may not operate correctly and the failure may go unnoticed. Security function is defined as the hardware, software, and/or firmware of the information system responsible for enforcing the system security policy and supporting the isolation of code and data on which the protection is based. Security functionality includes, but is not limited to, establishing system accounts, configuring access authorizations (i.e., permissions, privileges), setting events to be audited, and setting intrusion detection parameters. This requirement applies to the Ubuntu operating system performing security function verification/testing and/or systems and environments that require this functionality.
SV-238373r654294_rule UBTU-20-010453 CCI-000366 LOW The Ubuntu operating system must display the date and time of the last successful account logon upon logon. Configuration settings are the set of parameters that can be changed in hardware, software, or firmware components of the system that affect the security posture and/or functionality of the system. Security-related parameters are those parameters impacting the security state of the system, including the parameters required to satisfy other security control requirements. Security-related parameters include, for example: registry settings; account, file, directory permission settings; and settings for functions, ports, protocols, services, and remote connections.
SV-251503r808506_rule UBTU-20-010462 CCI-000366 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must not have accounts configured with blank or null passwords. If an account has an empty password, anyone could log on and run commands with the privileges of that account. Accounts with empty passwords should never be used in operational environments.
SV-251504r808509_rule UBTU-20-010463 CCI-000366 HIGH The Ubuntu operating system must not allow accounts configured with blank or null passwords. If an account has an empty password, anyone could log on and run commands with the privileges of that account. Accounts with empty passwords should never be used in operational environments.
SV-251505r808512_rule UBTU-20-010461 CCI-001958 MEDIUM The Ubuntu operating system must disable automatic mounting of Universal Serial Bus (USB) mass storage driver. Without authenticating devices, unidentified or unknown devices may be introduced, thereby facilitating malicious activity. Peripherals include, but are not limited to, such devices as flash drives, external storage, and printers.